Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A River System to Watch: Documenting the Effects of Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Biocontrol in the Virgin River Valley

A River System to Watch: Documenting the Effects of Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Biocontrol in the... PERSPECTIVE A River System to Watch: Documenting the Effects of Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Biocontrol in the Virgin River Valley Heather L. Bateman, Tom L. Dudley, Dan W. Bean, Steven M. Ostoja, Kevin R. Hultine and Michael J. Kuehn hroughout riparian areas of the southwestern both the environmental benefits and the potential costs of United States, non-native saltcedar (also known this tamarisk management method. Tas tamarisk; Tamarix spp.) can form dense, mono- typic stands and is often reported to have detrimental Policy History of Saltcedar Biocontrol effects on native plants and habitat quality (Everitt 1980; and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Shafroth et al. 2005). Natural resource managers of these riparian areas spend considerable time and resources con- The Virgin River, with both extensive saltcedar stands and trolling saltcedar using a variety of techniques, including native vegetation, flows from Zion National Park in south - chemical (Duncan and McDaniel 1998), mechanical, and western Utah through the northwest corner of Arizona and burning methods (Shafroth et al. 2005). Approximately into Nevada, where it flows into Lake Mead (Figure 1). one billion dollars are spent each year on river restoration Downstream from Lake Mead is the lower Colorado River, projects nationally (Bernhardt et al. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

A River System to Watch: Documenting the Effects of Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Biocontrol in the Virgin River Valley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/a-river-system-to-watch-documenting-the-effects-of-saltcedar-tamarix-l4k9ZB1ol4
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

PERSPECTIVE A River System to Watch: Documenting the Effects of Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Biocontrol in the Virgin River Valley Heather L. Bateman, Tom L. Dudley, Dan W. Bean, Steven M. Ostoja, Kevin R. Hultine and Michael J. Kuehn hroughout riparian areas of the southwestern both the environmental benefits and the potential costs of United States, non-native saltcedar (also known this tamarisk management method. Tas tamarisk; Tamarix spp.) can form dense, mono- typic stands and is often reported to have detrimental Policy History of Saltcedar Biocontrol effects on native plants and habitat quality (Everitt 1980; and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Shafroth et al. 2005). Natural resource managers of these riparian areas spend considerable time and resources con- The Virgin River, with both extensive saltcedar stands and trolling saltcedar using a variety of techniques, including native vegetation, flows from Zion National Park in south - chemical (Duncan and McDaniel 1998), mechanical, and western Utah through the northwest corner of Arizona and burning methods (Shafroth et al. 2005). Approximately into Nevada, where it flows into Lake Mead (Figure 1). one billion dollars are spent each year on river restoration Downstream from Lake Mead is the lower Colorado River, projects nationally (Bernhardt et al.

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Dec 9, 2010

There are no references for this article.