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A Critique of Silviculture: Managing for Complexity (review)

A Critique of Silviculture: Managing for Complexity (review) exceeded  the  land’s  long-term  carrying  capacity.  The   final   Despite  clinging  to  an  outdated  paradigm,  Manning  chapters  hail  the  exodus  of  inappropriate  mythologies  and  makes  a  convincing  argument  that  replacing  cattle  with  the  emergence  of  a  new  lifeway  and  land-use  ethic.  Man- bison  and  prairie  dogs,  and  ranching  with  ecotourism,  ning  is  a  master  of  seeking  out  obscure  information  about  make  sense.  Without  subsidies,  ranching  as  historically  historical  characters,  both  well  known  and  less  known. practiced  cannot  survive  economically.  Beyond  ranching,  The   book  is  infused  with  Manning’s  distaste  for  inap- what  are  the  options?  We  may  have  to  decide  on  the  basis  of  propriate  “learned  legacies”  of  ranching  and  farming.  This   personal  preference;  without  a  generally  accepted  “baseline”  aversion  leads  to  the  fi nal  chapter,  “A  Beginning,”  in  which  ecosystem  as  a  target,  reaching  consensus  may  be  difficult. he  lays  out  a  differ ent  vision,  one  focused  less  on  exploita- Some  scientists  recently  have  proposed  a  restoration  tion  and  more  on  conservation.  This   particular  vision  sees  venue  for  North  American  ecosystems  based  not  on  an  fewer  permanent  human  inhabitants,  less  obsession  with  early  historic  state  but  on  what  existed  15,000  years  ago  profit,   and  http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

A Critique of Silviculture: Managing for Complexity (review)

Ecological Restoration , Volume 28 (1) – Jun 10, 2010

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

exceeded  the  land’s  long-term  carrying  capacity.  The   final   Despite  clinging  to  an  outdated  paradigm,  Manning  chapters  hail  the  exodus  of  inappropriate  mythologies  and  makes  a  convincing  argument  that  replacing  cattle  with  the  emergence  of  a  new  lifeway  and  land-use  ethic.  Man- bison  and  prairie  dogs,  and  ranching  with  ecotourism,  ning  is  a  master  of  seeking  out  obscure  information  about  make  sense.  Without  subsidies,  ranching  as  historically  historical  characters,  both  well  known  and  less  known. practiced  cannot  survive  economically.  Beyond  ranching,  The   book  is  infused  with  Manning’s  distaste  for  inap- what  are  the  options?  We  may  have  to  decide  on  the  basis  of  propriate  “learned  legacies”  of  ranching  and  farming.  This   personal  preference;  without  a  generally  accepted  “baseline”  aversion  leads  to  the  fi nal  chapter,  “A  Beginning,”  in  which  ecosystem  as  a  target,  reaching  consensus  may  be  difficult. he  lays  out  a  differ ent  vision,  one  focused  less  on  exploita- Some  scientists  recently  have  proposed  a  restoration  tion  and  more  on  conservation.  This   particular  vision  sees  venue  for  North  American  ecosystems  based  not  on  an  fewer  permanent  human  inhabitants,  less  obsession  with  early  historic  state  but  on  what  existed  15,000  years  ago  profit,   and 

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jun 10, 2010

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