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Music, Text, Stuttering: An Intermedial Approach to Dramatick Opera in The Fairy Queen

Music, Text, Stuttering: An Intermedial Approach to Dramatick Opera in The Fairy Queen Restoration Volume 42.2 Music, Text, Stuttering: An Intermedial Approach to Dramatick Opera in The Fairy Queen Sharon J. Harris Brigham Young University Critics, from the Restoration to the near past, have not always accorded much respect to Restoration adaptations of Shakespeare plays, nor to the partially overlapping genre of Restoration dramatick opera. From Samuel Pepys—for whom a 1662 adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream was “the most insipid ridiculous play that I saw in my life”—to George C. D. Odell—who wrote in 1920 that George Granville’s adaptation of Merchant of Venice was “a gross vulgarisation” —and beyond, many critics have treated these adapta- tions as, at best, having “a certain charm and interest” but have dismissed or decried them as “imitative and derivative.” In recent decades we have come to better understand the social, legal, political, and cultural contexts of Restoration playmaking, including how the eventual elevation of Shakespeare as The Bard has conditioned our assessments of his Restoration adapters. Appreciation for the artistry of these adaptations as plays remains scarce, however. In this special issue, Amanda Eubanks Winkler shows how scholars have failed to engage Restoration dramatic art in general and makes a persuasive case for an in- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700 University of Tennessee

Music, Text, Stuttering: An Intermedial Approach to Dramatick Opera in The Fairy Queen

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Publisher
University of Tennessee
ISSN
1941-952X

Abstract

Restoration Volume 42.2 Music, Text, Stuttering: An Intermedial Approach to Dramatick Opera in The Fairy Queen Sharon J. Harris Brigham Young University Critics, from the Restoration to the near past, have not always accorded much respect to Restoration adaptations of Shakespeare plays, nor to the partially overlapping genre of Restoration dramatick opera. From Samuel Pepys—for whom a 1662 adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream was “the most insipid ridiculous play that I saw in my life”—to George C. D. Odell—who wrote in 1920 that George Granville’s adaptation of Merchant of Venice was “a gross vulgarisation” —and beyond, many critics have treated these adapta- tions as, at best, having “a certain charm and interest” but have dismissed or decried them as “imitative and derivative.” In recent decades we have come to better understand the social, legal, political, and cultural contexts of Restoration playmaking, including how the eventual elevation of Shakespeare as The Bard has conditioned our assessments of his Restoration adapters. Appreciation for the artistry of these adaptations as plays remains scarce, however. In this special issue, Amanda Eubanks Winkler shows how scholars have failed to engage Restoration dramatic art in general and makes a persuasive case for an in-

Journal

Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700University of Tennessee

Published: Mar 1, 2019

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