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Yosef H. Yerushalmi's Zakhor— Some Observations

Yosef H. Yerushalmi's Zakhor— Some Observations T H E J E W I S H Q U A R T E R LY R E V I E W , Vol. 97, No. 4 (Fall 2007) 491­501 MOSHE IDEL I : ` ` T H E FA I T H O F T H E FA L L E N J E W S ' ' T H E F O L L OW I NG R EM A R KS represent some amateurish reflections concerning some of the observations and assumptions found in Yosef H. Yerushalmi's Zakhor. They concern only quite a small part of this rich and thoughtful book, especially the initial pages and its final part. In this framework only two topics in the book will be addressed: the assumption that history is the faith of the fallen Jews, and then the stark distinction that Yerushalmi claims exists between premodern traditional Judaism and modern Jews' inclination toward history. Consequently, these forms of Judaism may hardly communicate. An attempt will be made to exemplify the complexity of the relationship between the two forms of Judaism. The faith in history by the ``fallen,'' an expression that reflects Yerushalmi's ironic understanding of modern interest http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Jewish Quarterly Review University of Pennsylvania Press

Yosef H. Yerushalmi's Zakhor— Some Observations

Jewish Quarterly Review , Volume 97 (4) – Dec 4, 2007

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1553-0604
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

T H E J E W I S H Q U A R T E R LY R E V I E W , Vol. 97, No. 4 (Fall 2007) 491­501 MOSHE IDEL I : ` ` T H E FA I T H O F T H E FA L L E N J E W S ' ' T H E F O L L OW I NG R EM A R KS represent some amateurish reflections concerning some of the observations and assumptions found in Yosef H. Yerushalmi's Zakhor. They concern only quite a small part of this rich and thoughtful book, especially the initial pages and its final part. In this framework only two topics in the book will be addressed: the assumption that history is the faith of the fallen Jews, and then the stark distinction that Yerushalmi claims exists between premodern traditional Judaism and modern Jews' inclination toward history. Consequently, these forms of Judaism may hardly communicate. An attempt will be made to exemplify the complexity of the relationship between the two forms of Judaism. The faith in history by the ``fallen,'' an expression that reflects Yerushalmi's ironic understanding of modern interest

Journal

Jewish Quarterly ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Dec 4, 2007

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