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Working the Diaspora: The Impact of African Labor on the Anglo-American World, 1650-1850 , and: Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions (review)

Working the Diaspora: The Impact of African Labor on the Anglo-American World, 1650-1850 , and:... democratized art form, remained the ``high ones'' from the ``best families'' (291). In a perfect world other scholars would take up the challenge to produce complementary studies centered in other parts of the country (particularly the South, where presumably the Village Enlightenment, based so much on print culture and literacy, would have looked much different), and focusing on the lower classes, in order to create a more fulsome understanding of the rise of consumer culture during this crucial time. A New Nation of Goods, a thing of beauty in its own right, its thick glossy pages lushly illustrated with over 100 illustrations and full-color plates, is a promising start. We ndy A . Wo los on is an independent scholar and consulting historian who advises on digital archives projects. Her research interests include nineteenth-century American consumer and material culture, usedgoods markets, and popular persuasion. Her most recent book, In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2009. Working the Diaspora: The Impact of African Labor on the Anglo­ American World, 1650­1850. By Frederick C. Knight. (New York: New York University Press, 2010. Pp. 240. Cloth, $48.00.) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Working the Diaspora: The Impact of African Labor on the Anglo-American World, 1650-1850 , and: Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (2) – Apr 21, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Abstract

democratized art form, remained the ``high ones'' from the ``best families'' (291). In a perfect world other scholars would take up the challenge to produce complementary studies centered in other parts of the country (particularly the South, where presumably the Village Enlightenment, based so much on print culture and literacy, would have looked much different), and focusing on the lower classes, in order to create a more fulsome understanding of the rise of consumer culture during this crucial time. A New Nation of Goods, a thing of beauty in its own right, its thick glossy pages lushly illustrated with over 100 illustrations and full-color plates, is a promising start. We ndy A . Wo los on is an independent scholar and consulting historian who advises on digital archives projects. Her research interests include nineteenth-century American consumer and material culture, usedgoods markets, and popular persuasion. Her most recent book, In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2009. Working the Diaspora: The Impact of African Labor on the Anglo­ American World, 1650­1850. By Frederick C. Knight. (New York: New York University Press, 2010. Pp. 240. Cloth, $48.00.)

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 21, 2011

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