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Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South (review)

Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South (review) REVIEWS Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. By Wilma A. Dunaway. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. 320. Cloth, $90.00.) Reviewed by Sheila R. Phipps In Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South, Wilma A. Dunaway fulfills ambitious goals. Foremost, she provides ample evidence to support her assertion that southern Appalachian women were not the uninvolved, two-dimensional, passive segment of the population they have been so long portrayed. She offers a much more dynamic picture of the mountain landscape by adding in the diverse racial, ethnic, and class distinctions among women who lived through the antebellum era. In addition, she debunks the notion that these women had little impact on the region by providing a comprehensive look at the many ways they contributed to the Appalachian economy. In all, Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South is an important addition to Appalachian historiography. To accomplish these goals, Dunaway uses an impressive array of sources. From personal papers and diaries to plantation account books and court records, from church minutes and census records to apprentice records and guardian bond books, she has made use of all sources she could find to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (1) – Feb 8, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. By Wilma A. Dunaway. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. 320. Cloth, $90.00.) Reviewed by Sheila R. Phipps In Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South, Wilma A. Dunaway fulfills ambitious goals. Foremost, she provides ample evidence to support her assertion that southern Appalachian women were not the uninvolved, two-dimensional, passive segment of the population they have been so long portrayed. She offers a much more dynamic picture of the mountain landscape by adding in the diverse racial, ethnic, and class distinctions among women who lived through the antebellum era. In addition, she debunks the notion that these women had little impact on the region by providing a comprehensive look at the many ways they contributed to the Appalachian economy. In all, Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South is an important addition to Appalachian historiography. To accomplish these goals, Dunaway uses an impressive array of sources. From personal papers and diaries to plantation account books and court records, from church minutes and census records to apprentice records and guardian bond books, she has made use of all sources she could find to

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 8, 2012

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