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Witches, Westerners, and HIV: AIDS and Cultures of Blame in Africa (review)

Witches, Westerners, and HIV: AIDS and Cultures of Blame in Africa (review) Reviews or whether they arise from the brevity of the majority of these articles is impossible to say. Certainly scholarship on central Europe enjoys the advantage of the large amount of work done on western European lands, and can draw on, contrast with, and challenge models developed in that scholarship. The editors of this volume, in their own work, are prime examples of that. Yet the articles they have gathered here generally do not seek to situate themselves in broader theoretical or methodological discussions, at least not in very complex ways. There are exceptions, of course. Benedek Lang's article ´ on a Polish magical text draws extensively on work on magical handbooks in western Europe, for example. Moreover, any readers interested in learning about specific beliefs in central European lands will certainly garner useful information from all of these articles. But those with a more general interest in magical or demonological beliefs and looking for significant advances in the paradigm of popular/elite interaction, either to support or challenge that paradigm, will come away disappointed. michael d. bailey Iowa State University alexander rodlach. Witches, Westerners, and HIV: AIDS and Cultures of ¨ Blame in Africa. Walnut Creek, Calif.: Left http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Witches, Westerners, and HIV: AIDS and Cultures of Blame in Africa (review)

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 3 (1) – May 14, 2008

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111
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Abstract

Reviews or whether they arise from the brevity of the majority of these articles is impossible to say. Certainly scholarship on central Europe enjoys the advantage of the large amount of work done on western European lands, and can draw on, contrast with, and challenge models developed in that scholarship. The editors of this volume, in their own work, are prime examples of that. Yet the articles they have gathered here generally do not seek to situate themselves in broader theoretical or methodological discussions, at least not in very complex ways. There are exceptions, of course. Benedek Lang's article ´ on a Polish magical text draws extensively on work on magical handbooks in western Europe, for example. Moreover, any readers interested in learning about specific beliefs in central European lands will certainly garner useful information from all of these articles. But those with a more general interest in magical or demonological beliefs and looking for significant advances in the paradigm of popular/elite interaction, either to support or challenge that paradigm, will come away disappointed. michael d. bailey Iowa State University alexander rodlach. Witches, Westerners, and HIV: AIDS and Cultures of ¨ Blame in Africa. Walnut Creek, Calif.: Left

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 14, 2008

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