Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Witchcraft Historiography (review)

Witchcraft Historiography (review) Book Reviews jonathan barry and owen davies, eds. Witchcraft Historiography. Houndmills, U.K.: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Pp. x 248. This important collection should be of interest to almost all readers of this journal. There have been countless book-length studies, and no few general surveys, of the history of European witchcraft and witch-hunting from the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries. The historiography of witchcraft, however, has received much less attention, and always in journal or encyclopedia articles, or as sections within books. This is hardly unusual. Booklength historiographies are rare. Yet the historiography of witchcraft is exceptionally fascinating. As the editors note, few other topics have engaged so directly with so many different methods and approaches to doing history. Especially given that much of the work in witchcraft studies is relatively recent (the field really came alive in the 1970s), the number of major methodological problems confronted (and contested) is impressive. The essays in this volume begin long before the 1970s, however, for many of the problems historians face when working on witchcraft stem from the way this phenomenon was conceived and constructed in the past. The first article, by P. G. Maxwell-Stuart, focuses on the era of the trials themselves, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Witchcraft Historiography (review)

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 3 (1) – May 14, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/witchcraft-historiography-review-2CyCvQwaSM
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews jonathan barry and owen davies, eds. Witchcraft Historiography. Houndmills, U.K.: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Pp. x 248. This important collection should be of interest to almost all readers of this journal. There have been countless book-length studies, and no few general surveys, of the history of European witchcraft and witch-hunting from the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries. The historiography of witchcraft, however, has received much less attention, and always in journal or encyclopedia articles, or as sections within books. This is hardly unusual. Booklength historiographies are rare. Yet the historiography of witchcraft is exceptionally fascinating. As the editors note, few other topics have engaged so directly with so many different methods and approaches to doing history. Especially given that much of the work in witchcraft studies is relatively recent (the field really came alive in the 1970s), the number of major methodological problems confronted (and contested) is impressive. The essays in this volume begin long before the 1970s, however, for many of the problems historians face when working on witchcraft stem from the way this phenomenon was conceived and constructed in the past. The first article, by P. G. Maxwell-Stuart, focuses on the era of the trials themselves,

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 14, 2008

There are no references for this article.