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Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding (review)

Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding (review) R EVIEWS E D I T E D B Y D AV I D WA L D S T R E I C H E R A N D J O N AT H A N D AV I D W E L L S Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding. By Alfred F. Young and Gregory H. Nobles. (New York: New York University Press, 2011. Pp. 286. Cloth, $79.00; paper, $26.00.) Reviewed by Eric Hinderaker This book consists of two long essays. The first, by Alfred F. Young, was originally published in 1995 and assesses the historiography of the American Revolution, especially in the half-century following the end of World War II.1 The second, by Gregory H. Nobles, focuses on the last two decades and explores the ways in which Revolutionary scholarship has expanded and shifted in that time. The result is a useful survey of an enormous body of work, and at the same time a telling recapitulation of the field's evolution and fragmentation. Young begins with a discussion of J. Franklin Jameson's The American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement (Princeton, NJ, 1926) to consider how scholars came gradually to ask whether, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (3) – Aug 13, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

R EVIEWS E D I T E D B Y D AV I D WA L D S T R E I C H E R A N D J O N AT H A N D AV I D W E L L S Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding. By Alfred F. Young and Gregory H. Nobles. (New York: New York University Press, 2011. Pp. 286. Cloth, $79.00; paper, $26.00.) Reviewed by Eric Hinderaker This book consists of two long essays. The first, by Alfred F. Young, was originally published in 1995 and assesses the historiography of the American Revolution, especially in the half-century following the end of World War II.1 The second, by Gregory H. Nobles, focuses on the last two decades and explores the ways in which Revolutionary scholarship has expanded and shifted in that time. The result is a useful survey of an enormous body of work, and at the same time a telling recapitulation of the field's evolution and fragmentation. Young begins with a discussion of J. Franklin Jameson's The American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement (Princeton, NJ, 1926) to consider how scholars came gradually to ask whether,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 13, 2012

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