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Whispers of Rebellion: Narrating Gabriel’s Conspiracy (review)

Whispers of Rebellion: Narrating Gabriel’s Conspiracy (review) REVIEWS Identity, Migration, and the Improvement of Albany, New York, 1750­ 1830,'' examines identity creation and adaptation in early America. Whispers of Rebellion: Narrating Gabriel's Conspiracy. By Michael L. Nicholls. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012. Pp. 248. Cloth, $42.50.) Reviewed by Douglas R. Egerton Compared with other slave conspiracies and rebellions around the Americas, the Virginia plot orchestrated by the blacksmith Gabriel in the summer of 1800 generated but a modest collection of documents for later generations to interpret. Unlike Nat Turner, Gabriel evidently did not speak at length to a court-appointed attorney. Nor did the many blacks and whites familiar with the proceedings and participants write lengthy accounts in later years, as was the case with the Vesey affair. (Most of the relevant documents, however, will soon be published by the historian Philip J. Schwarz and the University of Virginia Press.) As a result, scholars can interpret these meager documents in a variety of ways, teasing out tantalizing references that may hold clues to the dreams and goals of the conspirators. The latest scholar to explore the events of that contentious year is Michael L. Nicholls, a professor emeritus at Utah State University and the author http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Whispers of Rebellion: Narrating Gabriel’s Conspiracy (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Identity, Migration, and the Improvement of Albany, New York, 1750­ 1830,'' examines identity creation and adaptation in early America. Whispers of Rebellion: Narrating Gabriel's Conspiracy. By Michael L. Nicholls. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012. Pp. 248. Cloth, $42.50.) Reviewed by Douglas R. Egerton Compared with other slave conspiracies and rebellions around the Americas, the Virginia plot orchestrated by the blacksmith Gabriel in the summer of 1800 generated but a modest collection of documents for later generations to interpret. Unlike Nat Turner, Gabriel evidently did not speak at length to a court-appointed attorney. Nor did the many blacks and whites familiar with the proceedings and participants write lengthy accounts in later years, as was the case with the Vesey affair. (Most of the relevant documents, however, will soon be published by the historian Philip J. Schwarz and the University of Virginia Press.) As a result, scholars can interpret these meager documents in a variety of ways, teasing out tantalizing references that may hold clues to the dreams and goals of the conspirators. The latest scholar to explore the events of that contentious year is Michael L. Nicholls, a professor emeritus at Utah State University and the author

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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