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Where the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade by Randy J. Sparks, and: Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It by James Ciment (review)

Where the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade by Randy J. Sparks,... violently repress them and exclude their lives from the history of U.S. slave resistance (311­12). Se an Ge rri ty is a doctoral candidate in English and American Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His dissertation concerns representations of maroons in antebellum U.S. literature. Where the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade. By Randy J. Sparks. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. Pp. 309. Cloth, $29.95.) Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It. By James Ciment. (New York: Hill and Wang, 2013. Pp. 296. Cloth, $30.00.) Reviewed by Andrew N. Wegmann The Atlantic slave trade stands at the center of Atlantic World studies. Indeed, the centuries-long trade in human beings from the coast of Africa to the Americas and Europe has come to define how each society bordering the Atlantic explains its cultural and racial demographics. Tales of families torn apart for the profit of a white man, of countless numbers taken across the Atlantic and forced into the fields of Jamaica, South Carolina, and Virginia, have fascinated and frustrated scholars and readers for decades. But rarely have these http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Where the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade by Randy J. Sparks, and: Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It by James Ciment (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

violently repress them and exclude their lives from the history of U.S. slave resistance (311­12). Se an Ge rri ty is a doctoral candidate in English and American Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His dissertation concerns representations of maroons in antebellum U.S. literature. Where the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade. By Randy J. Sparks. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. Pp. 309. Cloth, $29.95.) Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It. By James Ciment. (New York: Hill and Wang, 2013. Pp. 296. Cloth, $30.00.) Reviewed by Andrew N. Wegmann The Atlantic slave trade stands at the center of Atlantic World studies. Indeed, the centuries-long trade in human beings from the coast of Africa to the Americas and Europe has come to define how each society bordering the Atlantic explains its cultural and racial demographics. Tales of families torn apart for the profit of a white man, of countless numbers taken across the Atlantic and forced into the fields of Jamaica, South Carolina, and Virginia, have fascinated and frustrated scholars and readers for decades. But rarely have these

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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