Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

What Makes the History of Capitalism Newsworthy?

What Makes the History of Capitalism Newsworthy? Review Essay SETH ROCKMAN Capitalism Takes Command: The Social Transformation of NineteenthCentury America. Edited by Michael Zakim and Gary J. Kornblith. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. Pp. viii 358. Cloth, $97.00; paper $32.00.) Capitalism may be in crisis as an economic system, but it is thriving as a subject within the historical profession. The ``history of capitalism'' now organizes a book series at Columbia University Press, a seminar program at the Newberry Library, a MOOC at Cornell University, a graduate field at University of Georgia, and a tenure line at Brown University. Undergraduate courses on American capitalism are filling lecture halls at Princeton, Florida, and Loyola University Chicago, while the New School for Social Research has launched its new Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies. The topic has provided thematic unity to recent annual meetings of the Social Science History Association and the Organization of American Historians. In the American Historical Association's state-of-the-field volume American History Now, the history of capitalism stands alongside established subfields like women's history and cultural history. A front-page article last year in the New York Times carried the headline, ``In History Class, Capitalism Sees Its Stock Soar.''1 Seth Rockman is associate professor of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

What Makes the History of Capitalism Newsworthy?

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (3) – Aug 12, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/what-makes-the-history-of-capitalism-newsworthy-tZu0D02eJ5
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review Essay SETH ROCKMAN Capitalism Takes Command: The Social Transformation of NineteenthCentury America. Edited by Michael Zakim and Gary J. Kornblith. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. Pp. viii 358. Cloth, $97.00; paper $32.00.) Capitalism may be in crisis as an economic system, but it is thriving as a subject within the historical profession. The ``history of capitalism'' now organizes a book series at Columbia University Press, a seminar program at the Newberry Library, a MOOC at Cornell University, a graduate field at University of Georgia, and a tenure line at Brown University. Undergraduate courses on American capitalism are filling lecture halls at Princeton, Florida, and Loyola University Chicago, while the New School for Social Research has launched its new Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies. The topic has provided thematic unity to recent annual meetings of the Social Science History Association and the Organization of American Historians. In the American Historical Association's state-of-the-field volume American History Now, the history of capitalism stands alongside established subfields like women's history and cultural history. A front-page article last year in the New York Times carried the headline, ``In History Class, Capitalism Sees Its Stock Soar.''1 Seth Rockman is associate professor of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 12, 2014

There are no references for this article.