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Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War by Rachel A. Shelden (review)

Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War by Rachel A.... REVIEWS a purely utilitarian lens, as almost virgin lands that potentially held solutions to their nation's most vexing problems. One can hardly help but wonder how such debates were received in the Latin American nations themselves. Those nations, of course, had their own problems, one of which was the aggressive and self-absorbed Colossus of the North. Ti moth y J. Hen ders on is professor of history at Auburn University­Montgomery. He is the author of A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States (New York, 2008). Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War. By Rachel A. Shelden. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013. Pp. 296. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by John M. Sacher In Washington Brotherhood, Rachel A. Shelden provides the reader a behind-the-scenes look at politics in the nation's capital from the 1840s to the secession crisis. Politics always exists beyond the traditional spheres of speeches and elections, but this was especially true in antebellum Washington where lawmakers worked together, ate and drank together, and often lived together under the same roof. These men also participated in the same reform movements, went to the same churches, and had http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War by Rachel A. Shelden (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS a purely utilitarian lens, as almost virgin lands that potentially held solutions to their nation's most vexing problems. One can hardly help but wonder how such debates were received in the Latin American nations themselves. Those nations, of course, had their own problems, one of which was the aggressive and self-absorbed Colossus of the North. Ti moth y J. Hen ders on is professor of history at Auburn University­Montgomery. He is the author of A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States (New York, 2008). Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War. By Rachel A. Shelden. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013. Pp. 296. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by John M. Sacher In Washington Brotherhood, Rachel A. Shelden provides the reader a behind-the-scenes look at politics in the nation's capital from the 1840s to the secession crisis. Politics always exists beyond the traditional spheres of speeches and elections, but this was especially true in antebellum Washington where lawmakers worked together, ate and drank together, and often lived together under the same roof. These men also participated in the same reform movements, went to the same churches, and had

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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