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Virginia’s American Revolution: From Dominion to Republic, 1776–1840 (review)

Virginia’s American Revolution: From Dominion to Republic, 1776–1840 (review) REVIEWS concept of political representation contested in the early republic, but what sort of portraits and forms of notetaking were appropriate ways of understanding people and recording their thoughts became indirect means of arguing about politics. Slauter starts his book off with a bang: investigating what it meant to sign the Constitution, and astonishing me (for what that is worth) by showing that some delegates were not approving of the document by so doing, but simply testifying to its general approbation and agreeing to send it to the states for ratification. Books such as these, along with the popularity of the recently built Constitution Center, reveal that from professional scholars to the busloads of children disembarking every day in downtown Philadelphia, there is as much thinking occurring about the Constitution and the nature of the republic as at any time in United States history. The very fact that spirited arguments continue as to what should be the limits of freedom of speech, what is a fair trial, what does the right to bear arms mean (sometimes ignoring the part of the amendment concerning a wellregulated militia; also the obligation of the federal government to suppress domestic insurrections), and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Virginia’s American Revolution: From Dominion to Republic, 1776–1840 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (1) – Feb 11, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS concept of political representation contested in the early republic, but what sort of portraits and forms of notetaking were appropriate ways of understanding people and recording their thoughts became indirect means of arguing about politics. Slauter starts his book off with a bang: investigating what it meant to sign the Constitution, and astonishing me (for what that is worth) by showing that some delegates were not approving of the document by so doing, but simply testifying to its general approbation and agreeing to send it to the states for ratification. Books such as these, along with the popularity of the recently built Constitution Center, reveal that from professional scholars to the busloads of children disembarking every day in downtown Philadelphia, there is as much thinking occurring about the Constitution and the nature of the republic as at any time in United States history. The very fact that spirited arguments continue as to what should be the limits of freedom of speech, what is a fair trial, what does the right to bear arms mean (sometimes ignoring the part of the amendment concerning a wellregulated militia; also the obligation of the federal government to suppress domestic insurrections), and

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 11, 2011

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