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Tribe, Race, History: Native Americans in Southern New England, 1780-1880 (review)

Tribe, Race, History: Native Americans in Southern New England, 1780-1880 (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) tion created a theoretical issue that could not be absorbed by the reality of sovereignty divided along the internal/external axis. LaCroix shows that citizens of the early republic understood that sovereignty could not be divided geographically, and they produced a rigorously theorized and highly creative federal system that focused on the judiciary and distributed power by subject matter, not geography. And yet how different were things really? In 1794 and 1798 the Federalist Party learned the futility of internal taxation, and the Republicans simply never tried it. Indeed, at the national level the Republicans became the political nation by looking to the external realm for all of their revenue and by intervening in the internal realm only when they could get voluntary consent. The one time they strayed from that creed, starting with the Embargo and Non-Intercourse Acts, they faced serious challenges. No matter how theoretically sophisticated American federalism became, the first half of the nineteenth century really wasn't all that different from the last half of the eighteenth: Central authority sought to govern in the interior at the real risk of demonstrating its impotence. As sophisticated as American federalism was, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Tribe, Race, History: Native Americans in Southern New England, 1780-1880 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) tion created a theoretical issue that could not be absorbed by the reality of sovereignty divided along the internal/external axis. LaCroix shows that citizens of the early republic understood that sovereignty could not be divided geographically, and they produced a rigorously theorized and highly creative federal system that focused on the judiciary and distributed power by subject matter, not geography. And yet how different were things really? In 1794 and 1798 the Federalist Party learned the futility of internal taxation, and the Republicans simply never tried it. Indeed, at the national level the Republicans became the political nation by looking to the external realm for all of their revenue and by intervening in the internal realm only when they could get voluntary consent. The one time they strayed from that creed, starting with the Embargo and Non-Intercourse Acts, they faced serious challenges. No matter how theoretically sophisticated American federalism became, the first half of the nineteenth century really wasn't all that different from the last half of the eighteenth: Central authority sought to govern in the interior at the real risk of demonstrating its impotence. As sophisticated as American federalism was,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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