Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Traveling the World with a Real Friend: The Eighteenth-Century Novel Reconsidered

Traveling the World with a Real Friend: The Eighteenth-Century Novel Reconsidered review essay Betty A. Paula Backscheider and Catherine Ingrassia, eds. A Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel and Culture. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. 550 + xiii pp. $199.95. [David] spent whole Days . . . wishing he could meet with a Friend that he could live with, who could throw off all separate Interests; for where Selfishness reigns in any of the Community, there can be no Happiness. After he had resolved these things several times in his Mind, he took the oddest, most unaccountable Resolution that ever was heard of, viz. To travel through the whole World, rather than not meet with a real Friend. From the time he lived with his Brother, he had led so recluse a Life, that he in a manner had shut himself up from the World; but yet when he reflected that what is called the Customs and Manners of Nations, relate chiefly to Ceremonies, and had nothing to do with the Hearts of Men; he concluded, he could sooner enter into the Characters of Men in the great Metropolis where he lived, than if he went into foreign Countries; where, not understanding the Languages so readily, it would be more difficult to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies University of Pennsylvania Press

Traveling the World with a Real Friend: The Eighteenth-Century Novel Reconsidered

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/traveling-the-world-with-a-real-friend-the-eighteenth-century-novel-bO0kISaUGo
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 JEMCS, Inc.
ISSN
1553-3786
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

review essay Betty A. Paula Backscheider and Catherine Ingrassia, eds. A Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel and Culture. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. 550 + xiii pp. $199.95. [David] spent whole Days . . . wishing he could meet with a Friend that he could live with, who could throw off all separate Interests; for where Selfishness reigns in any of the Community, there can be no Happiness. After he had resolved these things several times in his Mind, he took the oddest, most unaccountable Resolution that ever was heard of, viz. To travel through the whole World, rather than not meet with a real Friend. From the time he lived with his Brother, he had led so recluse a Life, that he in a manner had shut himself up from the World; but yet when he reflected that what is called the Customs and Manners of Nations, relate chiefly to Ceremonies, and had nothing to do with the Hearts of Men; he concluded, he could sooner enter into the Characters of Men in the great Metropolis where he lived, than if he went into foreign Countries; where, not understanding the Languages so readily, it would be more difficult to

Journal

Journal for Early Modern Cultural StudiesUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 26, 2008

There are no references for this article.