Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus : A "Poem" by Ludwig Wittgenstein

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus : A "Poem" by Ludwig Wittgenstein David Rozema In the Fall term of 1911 the 22-year-old presented himself to the Cambridge philosopher of mathematics, Bertrand Russell, as a prospective student of philosophy. Wittgenstein had left off his studies as a promising young aeronautical engineer because, in the course of his engineering studies, he had become obsessed with problems in the foundations of mathematics, the very problems Russell himself had tried to solve in his Principia Mathematica, a work he had completed just the year before. Wittgenstein, it seems, did not consider Russell's work to be the end of the matter, and so he had planned a book of his own on the subject. Although this work never materialized, Wittgenstein's interest in philosophy grew under his studies with Russell. And although Wittgenstein's early work in the philosophy of mathematics and logic were the initial impetus for his interest in philosophy, the events of his life soon led him back to the concerns which have always been central to the spirit of philosophy: How ought a man to live? What constitutes the good for man? What sort of life is a worthy or a beautiful one? It is likely that Wittgenstein's concern with these questions was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of Ideas University of Pennsylvania Press

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus : A "Poem" by Ludwig Wittgenstein

Journal of the History of Ideas , Volume 63 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/tractatus-logico-philosophicus-a-poem-by-ludwig-wittgenstein-VG8oaGTP19
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The Journal of the History of Ideas, Inc.
ISSN
1086-3222
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David Rozema In the Fall term of 1911 the 22-year-old presented himself to the Cambridge philosopher of mathematics, Bertrand Russell, as a prospective student of philosophy. Wittgenstein had left off his studies as a promising young aeronautical engineer because, in the course of his engineering studies, he had become obsessed with problems in the foundations of mathematics, the very problems Russell himself had tried to solve in his Principia Mathematica, a work he had completed just the year before. Wittgenstein, it seems, did not consider Russell's work to be the end of the matter, and so he had planned a book of his own on the subject. Although this work never materialized, Wittgenstein's interest in philosophy grew under his studies with Russell. And although Wittgenstein's early work in the philosophy of mathematics and logic were the initial impetus for his interest in philosophy, the events of his life soon led him back to the concerns which have always been central to the spirit of philosophy: How ought a man to live? What constitutes the good for man? What sort of life is a worthy or a beautiful one? It is likely that Wittgenstein's concern with these questions was

Journal

Journal of the History of IdeasUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.