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To Bring Law Home: The Federal Judiciary in Early National Rhode Island (review)

To Bring Law Home: The Federal Judiciary in Early National Rhode Island (review) REVIEWS Thanks to Red Jacket's oratory and a stout legal defense team, Tommy Jemmy was eventually set free. Considering the nationwide assault on Indian land and sovereignty in the 1820s, the case became a remarkable assertion of Seneca autonomy, though they would face new threats through the rest of the nineteenth century. Engaging a broad range of scholarly interests in early national revivalism, gender, Quakerism, Indian missions, and economic development, not to mention the Seneca themselves, Matthew Dennis shows that Seneca survival was as much a product of adaptation and persistence as it was a death and rebirth. Jo nath an Todd Hanc ock is a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation, ``Shocks to the Natural Order: Indians, Settlers, Slaves, and the New Madrid Earthquakes, 1811­12,'' shows how various earthquake interpretations reflected cultural, political, and territorial debates from the eastern Great Plains to the Atlantic seaboard. To Bring Law Home: The Federal Judiciary in Early National Rhode Island. By D. Kurt Graham. (DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2010. Pp. 194. Cloth, $32.00.) Reviewed by Erik J. Chaput To Bring Law Home uses Rhode Island as a case study to illustrate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

To Bring Law Home: The Federal Judiciary in Early National Rhode Island (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS Thanks to Red Jacket's oratory and a stout legal defense team, Tommy Jemmy was eventually set free. Considering the nationwide assault on Indian land and sovereignty in the 1820s, the case became a remarkable assertion of Seneca autonomy, though they would face new threats through the rest of the nineteenth century. Engaging a broad range of scholarly interests in early national revivalism, gender, Quakerism, Indian missions, and economic development, not to mention the Seneca themselves, Matthew Dennis shows that Seneca survival was as much a product of adaptation and persistence as it was a death and rebirth. Jo nath an Todd Hanc ock is a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation, ``Shocks to the Natural Order: Indians, Settlers, Slaves, and the New Madrid Earthquakes, 1811­12,'' shows how various earthquake interpretations reflected cultural, political, and territorial debates from the eastern Great Plains to the Atlantic seaboard. To Bring Law Home: The Federal Judiciary in Early National Rhode Island. By D. Kurt Graham. (DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2010. Pp. 194. Cloth, $32.00.) Reviewed by Erik J. Chaput To Bring Law Home uses Rhode Island as a case study to illustrate

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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