Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Thoreau the Land Surveyor (review)

Thoreau the Land Surveyor (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) presidential history in which contestation arises mainly from partisan factions within the governing class, and not ``the people.'' Nonetheless, Celebrating the Republic remains a welcome contribution to the study of political ritual that inspires us to rethink the category of presidential duty to include the invention and restyling of national icons. It also urges us to contemplate how, even now, the project of devising and reinterpreting presidential ceremonies, is still evolving. Ro nald J. Z bor ay is a professor of communication and affiliate faculty in women's studies and cultural studies at the University of Pittsburgh, where Mary Saracino Zboray is a visiting scholar. They are coauthors of Voices Without Votes: Women and Politics in Antebellum New England (Lebanon, NH, 2010). Their current project, ``The Bullet in the Book,'' which examines cultures of reading during the Civil War, is being funded by a 2012 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. Thoreau the Land Surveyor. By Patrick Chura. (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2010. Pp. 212. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by Dominique Zino Scholars of Henry David Thoreau have tended to dismiss the ways in which Thoreau earned his living--selling and making pencils, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Thoreau the Land Surveyor (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/thoreau-the-land-surveyor-review-B9B6OGkPt0
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) presidential history in which contestation arises mainly from partisan factions within the governing class, and not ``the people.'' Nonetheless, Celebrating the Republic remains a welcome contribution to the study of political ritual that inspires us to rethink the category of presidential duty to include the invention and restyling of national icons. It also urges us to contemplate how, even now, the project of devising and reinterpreting presidential ceremonies, is still evolving. Ro nald J. Z bor ay is a professor of communication and affiliate faculty in women's studies and cultural studies at the University of Pittsburgh, where Mary Saracino Zboray is a visiting scholar. They are coauthors of Voices Without Votes: Women and Politics in Antebellum New England (Lebanon, NH, 2010). Their current project, ``The Bullet in the Book,'' which examines cultures of reading during the Civil War, is being funded by a 2012 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. Thoreau the Land Surveyor. By Patrick Chura. (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2010. Pp. 212. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by Dominique Zino Scholars of Henry David Thoreau have tended to dismiss the ways in which Thoreau earned his living--selling and making pencils,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

There are no references for this article.