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The War of 1812 in the Age of Napoleon (review)

The War of 1812 in the Age of Napoleon (review) REVIEWS the impact of the Panic of 1837 on GWS. Unlike a neighboring textile mill that expired when its owners defaulted on their loans, the seminary weathered this crisis because it could call upon its social and political assets. As Beadie puts it, ``the same network of thousands of small debtors throughout western New York who failed to honor fully their subscription and tuition debts provided the institution with a strong political base from which to claim shares of state funds'' (299). By connecting the seminary with the rest of the state, its leaders and backers also contributed to the larger process of economic and political integration so characteristic of modern capitalism. Beadie is one among a small group of scholars who have studied the institutional history of American education in the early republic. Her work complements that of Margaret Nash on women's seminaries and Kim Tolley (with whom she has collaborated) on academies. Beadie has mined all the relevant archives, uncovering valuable data that a lesser scholar might have missed. While this diligence gives her book a richness that is satisfying, it also contributes to a level of detail that can be distracting. The book reads as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The War of 1812 in the Age of Napoleon (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS the impact of the Panic of 1837 on GWS. Unlike a neighboring textile mill that expired when its owners defaulted on their loans, the seminary weathered this crisis because it could call upon its social and political assets. As Beadie puts it, ``the same network of thousands of small debtors throughout western New York who failed to honor fully their subscription and tuition debts provided the institution with a strong political base from which to claim shares of state funds'' (299). By connecting the seminary with the rest of the state, its leaders and backers also contributed to the larger process of economic and political integration so characteristic of modern capitalism. Beadie is one among a small group of scholars who have studied the institutional history of American education in the early republic. Her work complements that of Margaret Nash on women's seminaries and Kim Tolley (with whom she has collaborated) on academies. Beadie has mined all the relevant archives, uncovering valuable data that a lesser scholar might have missed. While this diligence gives her book a richness that is satisfying, it also contributes to a level of detail that can be distracting. The book reads as

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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