Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Trial of Frederick Eberle: Language, Patriotism, and Citizenship in Philadelphia’s German Community, 1790 to 1830 (review)

The Trial of Frederick Eberle: Language, Patriotism, and Citizenship in Philadelphia’s German... REVIEWS issues that does not come to a climax with Jefferson.) Perhaps this is inevitable. The slavery metaphor, after all, was a ``crucial and fluid concept . . . applied to a wide variety of events and values and was constantly being defined and redefined'' (xi). Still, by the end of the book, with my thoughts provoked but my head spinning, I was put less in mind of Jefferson and more of that great lyricist, Katy Perry: ``You're yes then you're no/ You're in then you're out/ You're up then you're down.'' Like any important concept, the slavery metaphor was indeed complex and contradictory, fluid and malleable, ambiguous and multivalent, defined and redefined. That language always gets heads nodding in seminar rooms, needless to say, but as scholarly argument (or as song lyric for that matter), it leaves me wanting more. I realize this is probably an unpopular position among historians rightly wary of simplification, or scholars appropriately imbued with postmodern instincts, but it seems to me that authors should not just elaborate the complex and contradictory nature of things, but should also try to impart, however imperfectly or even wrongly, greater coherence to the fascinating ideas they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Trial of Frederick Eberle: Language, Patriotism, and Citizenship in Philadelphia’s German Community, 1790 to 1830 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/the-trial-of-frederick-eberle-language-patriotism-and-citizenship-in-4vk0ey07AH
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS issues that does not come to a climax with Jefferson.) Perhaps this is inevitable. The slavery metaphor, after all, was a ``crucial and fluid concept . . . applied to a wide variety of events and values and was constantly being defined and redefined'' (xi). Still, by the end of the book, with my thoughts provoked but my head spinning, I was put less in mind of Jefferson and more of that great lyricist, Katy Perry: ``You're yes then you're no/ You're in then you're out/ You're up then you're down.'' Like any important concept, the slavery metaphor was indeed complex and contradictory, fluid and malleable, ambiguous and multivalent, defined and redefined. That language always gets heads nodding in seminar rooms, needless to say, but as scholarly argument (or as song lyric for that matter), it leaves me wanting more. I realize this is probably an unpopular position among historians rightly wary of simplification, or scholars appropriately imbued with postmodern instincts, but it seems to me that authors should not just elaborate the complex and contradictory nature of things, but should also try to impart, however imperfectly or even wrongly, greater coherence to the fascinating ideas they

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

There are no references for this article.