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The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in Nineteenth-Century America (review) R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX AND R AC H E L K . O N U F The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in NineteenthCentury America. By Gretchen A. Adams. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2008. Pp. 223. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by James S. Kabala Gretchen A. Adams's The Specter of Salem seeks to provide a full account not of the Salem witchcraft trials themselves, but of their place in the cultural memory of succeeding generations of Americans. Adams begins with a competent summary of current scholarship on the trials, drawn in large part from Mary Beth Norton's In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (New York, 2002). After this, although there are brief discussions of the memory of the witch trials in the colonial era and the twentieth century, the focus of the book is, as the subtitle indicates, on the nineteenth century, from the early republic period to the aftermath of the Civil War. Adams devotes most of her chapter on the early republic to examining the discussions of the witch trials in early nineteenth-century textbooks. Most textbooks were written by New Englanders and were eager to describe http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX AND R AC H E L K . O N U F The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in NineteenthCentury America. By Gretchen A. Adams. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2008. Pp. 223. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by James S. Kabala Gretchen A. Adams's The Specter of Salem seeks to provide a full account not of the Salem witchcraft trials themselves, but of their place in the cultural memory of succeeding generations of Americans. Adams begins with a competent summary of current scholarship on the trials, drawn in large part from Mary Beth Norton's In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (New York, 2002). After this, although there are brief discussions of the memory of the witch trials in the colonial era and the twentieth century, the focus of the book is, as the subtitle indicates, on the nineteenth century, from the early republic period to the aftermath of the Civil War. Adams devotes most of her chapter on the early republic to examining the discussions of the witch trials in early nineteenth-century textbooks. Most textbooks were written by New Englanders and were eager to describe

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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