The Shrine as a Motor: A Metaphoric Exploration of Shamans and Electrical Flows in the Republic of Korea

The Shrine as a Motor: A Metaphoric Exploration of Shamans and Electrical Flows in the Republic... <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article looks through the metaphoric lens of a motor run by electricity at the dynamics of ritual activity surrounding the shrine of a Korean shaman, or mansin. In the mansin&apos;s worldview, her own body acts as both a conduit—bringing power back to the shrine—and as a motorized vehicle when she performs a major ritual kut. This intentionally playful metaphorical reimagining of the mansin&apos;s shrine as something very like a motor, driven by something very like an electrical connection, opens a conversation about otherwise largely imperceptible connections between people, objects, and things, and how they work in practice Some power flows are stronger than others and some shrines are understood to be more efficacious than others. The Korean mansin&apos;s shrine, like any material presence, is a mobile and mutable place, as this metaphoric exercise makes evident.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

The Shrine as a Motor: A Metaphoric Exploration of Shamans and Electrical Flows in the Republic of Korea

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft, Volume 13 (2) – Dec 7, 2018

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
The University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article looks through the metaphoric lens of a motor run by electricity at the dynamics of ritual activity surrounding the shrine of a Korean shaman, or mansin. In the mansin&apos;s worldview, her own body acts as both a conduit—bringing power back to the shrine—and as a motorized vehicle when she performs a major ritual kut. This intentionally playful metaphorical reimagining of the mansin&apos;s shrine as something very like a motor, driven by something very like an electrical connection, opens a conversation about otherwise largely imperceptible connections between people, objects, and things, and how they work in practice Some power flows are stronger than others and some shrines are understood to be more efficacious than others. The Korean mansin&apos;s shrine, like any material presence, is a mobile and mutable place, as this metaphoric exercise makes evident.</p>

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Dec 7, 2018

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