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The Religiosity of a Former Confucian-Buddhist: The Catholic Faith of Yang Tingyun

The Religiosity of a Former Confucian-Buddhist: The Catholic Faith of Yang Tingyun Abstract: Yang Tingyun (1557?-1627) was one of the most prominent Confucian scholar-officials converted to Catholicism in the early seventeenth century. Since he was not attracted to the Jesuits by European sciences, he has been thought of as an experimental convert who moved successively through Confucianism (Ru) and Buddhism (Chan) and finally found satisfaction in Christianity (Ye). This linear and unidirectional reading of his spiritual journey is simplistic. To understand his religiosity accurately, this essay contends for seeing his relationship with Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity as always a two-way, three-way, and even multiple-way interaction involving diverse kinds of both acceptance and rejection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of Ideas University of Pennsylvania Press

The Religiosity of a Former Confucian-Buddhist: The Catholic Faith of Yang Tingyun

Journal of the History of Ideas , Volume 73 (1) – Jan 6, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Journal of the History of Ideas, Inc.
ISSN
1086-3222
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Yang Tingyun (1557?-1627) was one of the most prominent Confucian scholar-officials converted to Catholicism in the early seventeenth century. Since he was not attracted to the Jesuits by European sciences, he has been thought of as an experimental convert who moved successively through Confucianism (Ru) and Buddhism (Chan) and finally found satisfaction in Christianity (Ye). This linear and unidirectional reading of his spiritual journey is simplistic. To understand his religiosity accurately, this essay contends for seeing his relationship with Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity as always a two-way, three-way, and even multiple-way interaction involving diverse kinds of both acceptance and rejection.

Journal

Journal of the History of IdeasUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 6, 2012

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