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The Prophet and the Reformer: The Letters of Brigham Young and Thomas L. Kane ed. by Matthew J. Grow and Ronald W. Walker (review)

The Prophet and the Reformer: The Letters of Brigham Young and Thomas L. Kane ed. by Matthew J.... REVIEWS Civil War Era in a Northern Community (Lawrence, KS, 2011) and is currently working on a project on the post-Civil War suffrage. The Prophet and the Reformer: The Letters of Brigham Young and Thomas L. Kane. Edited by Matthew J. Grow and Ronald W. Walker. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 568. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by Nathaniel Wiewora Thomas Kane and Brigham Young were not natural friends. Kane was a Philadelphia Democrat born into a wealthy family. He had a reforming spirit, and he was constantly weak from illness. Kane opposed injustice and inequality, whether in the form of religious persecution, slavery, or capital punishment. Throughout his life, he also sought religious fulfillment, but Kane never found comfort in institutional religion. Young was his mirror opposite. Born into rougher circumstances, this Mormon leader lived his life on the edges of society. Young embraced an upstart faith, preached it to the ends of the earth, and assumed the mantle of leadership after the death of its founder, Joseph Smith. When all seemed lost, he acted vigorously, organizing a migration of thousands of Mormon pioneers to the Great Basin, where he oversaw the establishment of a theocratic order. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Prophet and the Reformer: The Letters of Brigham Young and Thomas L. Kane ed. by Matthew J. Grow and Ronald W. Walker (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (2) – May 24, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Civil War Era in a Northern Community (Lawrence, KS, 2011) and is currently working on a project on the post-Civil War suffrage. The Prophet and the Reformer: The Letters of Brigham Young and Thomas L. Kane. Edited by Matthew J. Grow and Ronald W. Walker. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 568. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by Nathaniel Wiewora Thomas Kane and Brigham Young were not natural friends. Kane was a Philadelphia Democrat born into a wealthy family. He had a reforming spirit, and he was constantly weak from illness. Kane opposed injustice and inequality, whether in the form of religious persecution, slavery, or capital punishment. Throughout his life, he also sought religious fulfillment, but Kane never found comfort in institutional religion. Young was his mirror opposite. Born into rougher circumstances, this Mormon leader lived his life on the edges of society. Young embraced an upstart faith, preached it to the ends of the earth, and assumed the mantle of leadership after the death of its founder, Joseph Smith. When all seemed lost, he acted vigorously, organizing a migration of thousands of Mormon pioneers to the Great Basin, where he oversaw the establishment of a theocratic order.

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 24, 2017

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