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The Origins of American Religious Nationalism by Sam Haselby (review)

The Origins of American Religious Nationalism by Sam Haselby (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2017) The Origins of American Religious Nationalism. By Sam Haselby. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 336. Cloth, $74.00.) Reviewed by Hunter Price Connecticut minister Horace Bushnell believed westward migration imperiled the nation. On a desolate frontier, education and religion would deteriorate. Slouching toward barbarism, settlers would mistake emotion for religion, chase revelation through visions, and practice divination through the dead--or so the reformer told Bostonians and New Yorkers in 1847. The solution was home missions, the complex of preachers, colporteurs, tracts, and Bibles flowing from the northeastern cities. If the frontier threatened the nation, efficient, evangelical management promised to save it. Some westerners disagreed. Sam Haselby returns us to this cultural contest and places it centrally in the development of the United States as an imagined national community. Much literature on religion and American nationalism has a different focus. Understanding evangelicalism as akin to mass communication, many historians describe American Protestantism as a unifying force, a system of shared values and voluntary associations whose strength rivaled political parties as the cords of union, until being cleft by the slavery issue in the 1830s and 1840s. Haselby also stresses communications, particularly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Origins of American Religious Nationalism by Sam Haselby (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (1) – Feb 23, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2017) The Origins of American Religious Nationalism. By Sam Haselby. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 336. Cloth, $74.00.) Reviewed by Hunter Price Connecticut minister Horace Bushnell believed westward migration imperiled the nation. On a desolate frontier, education and religion would deteriorate. Slouching toward barbarism, settlers would mistake emotion for religion, chase revelation through visions, and practice divination through the dead--or so the reformer told Bostonians and New Yorkers in 1847. The solution was home missions, the complex of preachers, colporteurs, tracts, and Bibles flowing from the northeastern cities. If the frontier threatened the nation, efficient, evangelical management promised to save it. Some westerners disagreed. Sam Haselby returns us to this cultural contest and places it centrally in the development of the United States as an imagined national community. Much literature on religion and American nationalism has a different focus. Understanding evangelicalism as akin to mass communication, many historians describe American Protestantism as a unifying force, a system of shared values and voluntary associations whose strength rivaled political parties as the cords of union, until being cleft by the slavery issue in the 1830s and 1840s. Haselby also stresses communications, particularly

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 23, 2017

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