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The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) slaved African Americans to the Act, the influence of gender and sexuality on the slavery politics of the 1850s, and the influence of culture on the political breakdown and violence that resulted in civil war. Br ie Sw ens on A rnol d is an assistant professor of history at Coe College. She recently completed a dissertation on the gendered and sexualized discourse that surrounded the Kansas crisis in northern popular print and political culture in the 1850s. The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America. By Jay Sexton. (New York: Hill and Wang, 2011. Pp. 294. Paper, $26.00.) Reviewed by James E. Lewis, Jr. A touchstone for American foreign policy for the better part of two centuries, the Monroe Doctrine possesses a rich and varied history that has been examined for many different eras and from many different angles by historians, political scientists, and others. One might wonder if it remains possible to say anything novel about it, particularly in a work that is broadly accessible and largely synthetic. By making new choices about periodization and perspective, however, Jay Sexton offers an informative and impressive account of the Monroe http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) slaved African Americans to the Act, the influence of gender and sexuality on the slavery politics of the 1850s, and the influence of culture on the political breakdown and violence that resulted in civil war. Br ie Sw ens on A rnol d is an assistant professor of history at Coe College. She recently completed a dissertation on the gendered and sexualized discourse that surrounded the Kansas crisis in northern popular print and political culture in the 1850s. The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America. By Jay Sexton. (New York: Hill and Wang, 2011. Pp. 294. Paper, $26.00.) Reviewed by James E. Lewis, Jr. A touchstone for American foreign policy for the better part of two centuries, the Monroe Doctrine possesses a rich and varied history that has been examined for many different eras and from many different angles by historians, political scientists, and others. One might wonder if it remains possible to say anything novel about it, particularly in a work that is broadly accessible and largely synthetic. By making new choices about periodization and perspective, however, Jay Sexton offers an informative and impressive account of the Monroe

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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