Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire by Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy (review)

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) mouths, may have lost some nourishment for their own children,'' even as they received some material benefit for their sacrifices (187). And the master class was not limited to white people: Smith provides glimpses of Cherokee masters in the ``wealthy Cherokee woman [who] asked her two slaves to teach her how to read'' (60) and in the abuse of the enslaved woman Patience who lived on the Cherokee-owned Vann plantation (254). Colored masters appear in the estate records of Hagar Richardson (194­95). Smith incorporates a variety of evidence into her study, including wills and plantation journals. She limits her Native section largely to Catawba and Cherokee Indians, and gains insight from the records of missionaries and other travelers among the Indians. Given the nature of the sources, the section on white mothers offers more direct access to the inner lives of elite women through letters and diaries, but Smith also skillfully teases out what she can about the lives of poor white women through legal records. Finally, the author mines the nineteenth-century narratives of former slaves, legal proceedings, and freedmen registries to examine the limits and possibilities of motherhood for black http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire by Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/the-men-who-lost-america-british-leadership-the-american-revolution-SgYOD7v3v0
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) mouths, may have lost some nourishment for their own children,'' even as they received some material benefit for their sacrifices (187). And the master class was not limited to white people: Smith provides glimpses of Cherokee masters in the ``wealthy Cherokee woman [who] asked her two slaves to teach her how to read'' (60) and in the abuse of the enslaved woman Patience who lived on the Cherokee-owned Vann plantation (254). Colored masters appear in the estate records of Hagar Richardson (194­95). Smith incorporates a variety of evidence into her study, including wills and plantation journals. She limits her Native section largely to Catawba and Cherokee Indians, and gains insight from the records of missionaries and other travelers among the Indians. Given the nature of the sources, the section on white mothers offers more direct access to the inner lives of elite women through letters and diaries, but Smith also skillfully teases out what she can about the lives of poor white women through legal records. Finally, the author mines the nineteenth-century narratives of former slaves, legal proceedings, and freedmen registries to examine the limits and possibilities of motherhood for black

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

There are no references for this article.