Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic , and: A Society of Gentlemen: Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy 1845-1861 (review)

The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic... REVIEWS only southern seaman author is an Irish-born Kentuckian named John Ross Browne. Glenn cannot be faulted for the dearth of black and southern sailor self narratives published between 1815 and 1860, and she addresses the study's relative lack of racial diversity in the book's introduction. But the paucity of applicable southern and African American accounts is particularly unfortunate during the frequent examinations of honor and sailors' fears about emasculation and enslavement. British impressments and violations of the nation's honor provoked southern ``War Hawks'' to advocate for war in 1812. The Haitian Revolution horrified northern white seamen who observed blacks slaughtering and subjugating whites. How did southern sailors interpret such episodes? Amid discussions of ``negro-driving skippers'' (111) who administered ``the lash of slavery'' (131) upon the backs of white seamen, a black reaction was conspicuously absent. When evaluating assertions that liquor ``enslaved'' men (146) and other such tropes, both a southern and black perspective were sorely missed. Despite this deficiency, Jack Tar's Story is a noteworthy and welcome contribution to both literary and historical scholarship. Free of jargon, yet skillfully researched and written, this text could be assigned to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Scholars of maritime and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic , and: A Society of Gentlemen: Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy 1845-1861 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/the-long-road-to-annapolis-the-founding-of-the-naval-academy-and-the-NQ1Ec9JK7g
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS only southern seaman author is an Irish-born Kentuckian named John Ross Browne. Glenn cannot be faulted for the dearth of black and southern sailor self narratives published between 1815 and 1860, and she addresses the study's relative lack of racial diversity in the book's introduction. But the paucity of applicable southern and African American accounts is particularly unfortunate during the frequent examinations of honor and sailors' fears about emasculation and enslavement. British impressments and violations of the nation's honor provoked southern ``War Hawks'' to advocate for war in 1812. The Haitian Revolution horrified northern white seamen who observed blacks slaughtering and subjugating whites. How did southern sailors interpret such episodes? Amid discussions of ``negro-driving skippers'' (111) who administered ``the lash of slavery'' (131) upon the backs of white seamen, a black reaction was conspicuously absent. When evaluating assertions that liquor ``enslaved'' men (146) and other such tropes, both a southern and black perspective were sorely missed. Despite this deficiency, Jack Tar's Story is a noteworthy and welcome contribution to both literary and historical scholarship. Free of jargon, yet skillfully researched and written, this text could be assigned to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Scholars of maritime and

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

There are no references for this article.