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The Jewish Apostate and the American Expatriate: Leave-Taking in the Early American Republic

The Jewish Apostate and the American Expatriate: Leave-Taking in the Early American Republic <p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay argues that the complexities and ambiguities of the religious identity that emerge in the story of the apostasy of the Jew turned Christian missionary, Joseph Samuel Christian Frederick Frey—specifically his contested leave—taking from Judaism, his seemingly unshakeable affiliation with his original faith, and the uncertain nature of his identity as a Christian long after his apostasy-provide new insights about civic allegiance and expatriation in early America. Departing from the Protestant model that has dominated discussions of religious belonging in the early republic, the essay recovers a current of Jewish thinking as a means of deepening our understanding of civic and religious belonging in the period as a whole.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Jewish Apostate and the American Expatriate: Leave-Taking in the Early American Republic

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 41 (1) – Mar 2, 2021

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay argues that the complexities and ambiguities of the religious identity that emerge in the story of the apostasy of the Jew turned Christian missionary, Joseph Samuel Christian Frederick Frey—specifically his contested leave—taking from Judaism, his seemingly unshakeable affiliation with his original faith, and the uncertain nature of his identity as a Christian long after his apostasy-provide new insights about civic allegiance and expatriation in early America. Departing from the Protestant model that has dominated discussions of religious belonging in the early republic, the essay recovers a current of Jewish thinking as a means of deepening our understanding of civic and religious belonging in the period as a whole.</p>

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Mar 2, 2021

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