The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772–1832 by Alan Taylor (review)

The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772–1832 by Alan Taylor (review) REVIEWS resistance to conversion while allowing the missionaries to educate his daughter. And despite possibly feeling that Clarke excuses Wilson too easily, readers will comprehend why he eventually returned to South Carolina and sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War. The problematic aspects of the book are few. First, though Clarke eloquently sets each scene, the details can become distracting. It is difficult to keep up with the more than sixty people to whom Clarke introduces the reader. Second, he provides only glimpses of what must surely have been complicated relationships between and among enslaved women, free black and African women, and white women. How did they understand one another, navigate patriarchal society, and negotiate the changing world around them? Clarke's nuanced analysis of other relationships makes the lack of attention to female narratives noticeable. In sum, By the Rivers of Water is a complex narrative about cultural interchange, power, and ultimately the pull of home. It is accessible to scholars and non-academics alike. Am y Mar ie J ohn son is assistant professor of history at Elon University. The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772­1832. By Alan Taylor. (New York: W. W. Norton, 2013. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772–1832 by Alan Taylor (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS resistance to conversion while allowing the missionaries to educate his daughter. And despite possibly feeling that Clarke excuses Wilson too easily, readers will comprehend why he eventually returned to South Carolina and sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War. The problematic aspects of the book are few. First, though Clarke eloquently sets each scene, the details can become distracting. It is difficult to keep up with the more than sixty people to whom Clarke introduces the reader. Second, he provides only glimpses of what must surely have been complicated relationships between and among enslaved women, free black and African women, and white women. How did they understand one another, navigate patriarchal society, and negotiate the changing world around them? Clarke's nuanced analysis of other relationships makes the lack of attention to female narratives noticeable. In sum, By the Rivers of Water is a complex narrative about cultural interchange, power, and ultimately the pull of home. It is accessible to scholars and non-academics alike. Am y Mar ie J ohn son is assistant professor of history at Elon University. The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772­1832. By Alan Taylor. (New York: W. W. Norton, 2013.

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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