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The Ideological Origins of American Federalism (review)

The Ideological Origins of American Federalism (review) REVIEWS American Aristocracy raises many questions for future research. Was the warmth toward southerners explained in part as a reaction to the political activism of abolitionists? Did the presence of a visible African American upper class drive Philadelphia elites to socialize with slave-owning southerners? How did the city's complicated relationship with emancipation, race riots, and reform, shape these social connections? In sum, Daniel Kilbride has provided a thoughtful analysis, which is sensitive to the influence of gender, of a culturally significant segment of the population. An American Aristocracy will be useful to those who are interested in the intersections of class and region as well as daily life in Philadelphia during the antebellum era. Su san J . St anf ield is a PhD candidate in history at the University of Iowa. She is currently writing her dissertation, titled ``Imagining Citizenship in Black and White: Domestic Literature, `True Womanhood,' and the Creation of Civic Identity in Antebellum America.'' The Ideological Origins of American Federalism. By Alison L. LaCroix. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010. Pp. 312. Cloth, $45.00.) Reviewed by Andrew Shankman Alison LaCroix's very good but at times mildly frustrating book ``commences in the North American colonies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Ideological Origins of American Federalism (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS American Aristocracy raises many questions for future research. Was the warmth toward southerners explained in part as a reaction to the political activism of abolitionists? Did the presence of a visible African American upper class drive Philadelphia elites to socialize with slave-owning southerners? How did the city's complicated relationship with emancipation, race riots, and reform, shape these social connections? In sum, Daniel Kilbride has provided a thoughtful analysis, which is sensitive to the influence of gender, of a culturally significant segment of the population. An American Aristocracy will be useful to those who are interested in the intersections of class and region as well as daily life in Philadelphia during the antebellum era. Su san J . St anf ield is a PhD candidate in history at the University of Iowa. She is currently writing her dissertation, titled ``Imagining Citizenship in Black and White: Domestic Literature, `True Womanhood,' and the Creation of Civic Identity in Antebellum America.'' The Ideological Origins of American Federalism. By Alison L. LaCroix. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010. Pp. 312. Cloth, $45.00.) Reviewed by Andrew Shankman Alison LaCroix's very good but at times mildly frustrating book ``commences in the North American colonies

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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