Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The Home Frontier: Households, Gender, and National Expansion in the Early Republic

The Home Frontier: Households, Gender, and National Expansion in the Early Republic <p>Abstract:</p><p>This review essay considers two new books that reinterpret the political history of early national expansion, placing households and gendered power relations at its center. Focusing on Kentucky and Florida, respectively, Honor Sachs and Laurel Clark Shire explore the language of domestic order and the role of the ideal white settler household in expansionist rhetoric, racial ideologies, settler-colonial law, frontier statebuilding, and Native American dispossession. By centering households as a unit of analysis, Sachs and Shire offer historians a model for building an intersectional history of frontier politics—one that integrates women into the political narrative of U.S. expansion, and uncovers the significance of gender to the policies that helped make the early republic an empire.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Home Frontier: Households, Gender, and National Expansion in the Early Republic

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/the-home-frontier-households-gender-and-national-expansion-in-the-ItWNq5kLYg
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This review essay considers two new books that reinterpret the political history of early national expansion, placing households and gendered power relations at its center. Focusing on Kentucky and Florida, respectively, Honor Sachs and Laurel Clark Shire explore the language of domestic order and the role of the ideal white settler household in expansionist rhetoric, racial ideologies, settler-colonial law, frontier statebuilding, and Native American dispossession. By centering households as a unit of analysis, Sachs and Shire offer historians a model for building an intersectional history of frontier politics—one that integrates women into the political narrative of U.S. expansion, and uncovers the significance of gender to the policies that helped make the early republic an empire.</p>

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

There are no references for this article.