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The First Prejudice: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early America ed. by Chris Beneke and Christopher S. Grenda (review)

The First Prejudice: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early America ed. by Chris Beneke and... The First Prejudice: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early America. Edited by Chris Beneke and Christopher S. Grenda. (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Pp. 401, Hardcover, $45.00.) Reviewed by J. Kime Lawson The First Prejudice is a collection of twelve essays by leading historians that reexamine the role of religious tolerance and persecution in shaping the legal and cultural practices of the early American colonies. Religion is called ``the first prejudice'' in early America because before the legal imposition of racially based forms of intolerance, municipal authorities mandated the practice of religious customs and often punished nonconformists with violence. Studying the history of tolerance and intolerance in America has typically been the domain of legal or church historians focused on court records or sermons, but this volume demonstrates that closer scholarly attention to sources illustrating lived religion, local legal norms, or everyday practices can complicate longstanding assumptions about early American religious history. While most religious histories of early America have stressed big events like the English Toleration Act or the American Revolution to describe continuity, change, or progress during the period, each selection in this volume challenges the usefulness of those categories to explain the more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The First Prejudice: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early America ed. by Chris Beneke and Christopher S. Grenda (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (2) – Apr 17, 2013

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

The First Prejudice: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early America. Edited by Chris Beneke and Christopher S. Grenda. (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Pp. 401, Hardcover, $45.00.) Reviewed by J. Kime Lawson The First Prejudice is a collection of twelve essays by leading historians that reexamine the role of religious tolerance and persecution in shaping the legal and cultural practices of the early American colonies. Religion is called ``the first prejudice'' in early America because before the legal imposition of racially based forms of intolerance, municipal authorities mandated the practice of religious customs and often punished nonconformists with violence. Studying the history of tolerance and intolerance in America has typically been the domain of legal or church historians focused on court records or sermons, but this volume demonstrates that closer scholarly attention to sources illustrating lived religion, local legal norms, or everyday practices can complicate longstanding assumptions about early American religious history. While most religious histories of early America have stressed big events like the English Toleration Act or the American Revolution to describe continuity, change, or progress during the period, each selection in this volume challenges the usefulness of those categories to explain the more

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 17, 2013

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