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The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics by Christopher Childers (review)

The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2013) and fever dreams that accompanied the coming of the market revolution to the slave South. Ri char d Be ll is associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of We Shall Be No More: Suicide and SelfGovernment in the Newly United States (Cambridge, MA, 2012). The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics. By Christopher Childers. (Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2012. Pp. 334. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Amy S. Greenberg Christopher Childers has written the first monograph tracing the evolution of the concept of popular sovereignty from the establishment of the Southwest Territory in 1790 through the start of the Civil War. Most analyses of territorial expansion date the origins of popular sovereignty to the 1840s. But this latest offering from the University of Kansas Press series American Political Thought makes a compelling case that the idea as employed in the 1840s was the product of decades of debate and constitutional interpretation. The author argues that territorial expansion was a southern ideal as early as the 1780s, and that because territorial self-government, prior to the Kansas­Nebraska Act, always http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics by Christopher Childers (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (3) – Jul 5, 2013

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2013) and fever dreams that accompanied the coming of the market revolution to the slave South. Ri char d Be ll is associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of We Shall Be No More: Suicide and SelfGovernment in the Newly United States (Cambridge, MA, 2012). The Failure of Popular Sovereignty: Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Radicalization of Southern Politics. By Christopher Childers. (Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2012. Pp. 334. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Amy S. Greenberg Christopher Childers has written the first monograph tracing the evolution of the concept of popular sovereignty from the establishment of the Southwest Territory in 1790 through the start of the Civil War. Most analyses of territorial expansion date the origins of popular sovereignty to the 1840s. But this latest offering from the University of Kansas Press series American Political Thought makes a compelling case that the idea as employed in the 1840s was the product of decades of debate and constitutional interpretation. The author argues that territorial expansion was a southern ideal as early as the 1780s, and that because territorial self-government, prior to the Kansas­Nebraska Act, always

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jul 5, 2013

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