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The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, & Indian Allies (review)

The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, & Indian Allies (review) sage,'' Sexton argues, ``Americans built larger, more elaborate structures, only to have political opponents or subsequent generations renovate or even demolish and rebuild what lay before them'' (4). This sweeping and ambitious book has few shortcomings. A couple of factual errors have crept into its richly detailed narrative. Even the most dismal estimates, for example, would not claim that one-third of the Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears (84). And, inevitably, there are incidents and issues that do not receive as much attention as one might like. While Sexton emphasizes that the Monroe Doctrine was not referred to as a ``doctrine'' until the 1840s, he might have considered more fully the discussion and disavowal of it as a ``pledge'' in the mid-1820s, for instance. The acknowledged reference point for this book is Dexter Perkins's classic trilogy on the evolution of the Monroe Doctrine from 1823 to 1907. Sexton's book not only is more concise and more accessible than Perkins's trilogy but also situates the evolving doctrine in historical contexts shaped by scholarship in political, diplomatic, and, at times, cultural history that were simply unavailable when Perkins published in the 1920s and 1930s. Its insightful analysis and wide-ranging http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, & Indian Allies (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

sage,'' Sexton argues, ``Americans built larger, more elaborate structures, only to have political opponents or subsequent generations renovate or even demolish and rebuild what lay before them'' (4). This sweeping and ambitious book has few shortcomings. A couple of factual errors have crept into its richly detailed narrative. Even the most dismal estimates, for example, would not claim that one-third of the Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears (84). And, inevitably, there are incidents and issues that do not receive as much attention as one might like. While Sexton emphasizes that the Monroe Doctrine was not referred to as a ``doctrine'' until the 1840s, he might have considered more fully the discussion and disavowal of it as a ``pledge'' in the mid-1820s, for instance. The acknowledged reference point for this book is Dexter Perkins's classic trilogy on the evolution of the Monroe Doctrine from 1823 to 1907. Sexton's book not only is more concise and more accessible than Perkins's trilogy but also situates the evolving doctrine in historical contexts shaped by scholarship in political, diplomatic, and, at times, cultural history that were simply unavailable when Perkins published in the 1920s and 1930s. Its insightful analysis and wide-ranging

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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