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The Care and Management of Historic Hindu Temples in India: An Examination of Preservation Policies Influenced by the Venice Charter in Non-Judeo-Christian Contexts

The Care and Management of Historic Hindu Temples in India: An Examination of Preservation... THE CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF HISTORIC HINDU TEMPLES IN INDIA An Examination of Preservation Policies Influenced by the Venice Char ter in Non-Judeo-Christian Contexts ASHIMA KRISHNA University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Figure 1. Krishna's butterball is part of the larger complex of stone temples in the southern Indian town of Mahabalipuram (also known as Mamallapuram) in Tamil Nadu. While it is not a temple structure, the large, monolithic granite stone has defied laws of physics for centuries to balance as it does. As a result, it has been imbued with mythological significance from Hindu folklore as being the butterball that Lord Krishna played with as a child. (Ashima Krishna) Hindu temples constitute a complex architectural typology that has even more complicated cognitive associations in the form of traditional beliefs, rituals, and practices. This building typology is most abundantly found in India, but it is also growing outside the subcontinent, spurred by an increasing Hindu diaspora, making this discussion relevant in contexts far beyond India. This paper, however, examines how preservation policies in India, as well as provisions of the Venice Charter, often create conflict when applied to religious historic structures such as Hindu Temples http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Change Over Time University of Pennsylvania Press

The Care and Management of Historic Hindu Temples in India: An Examination of Preservation Policies Influenced by the Venice Charter in Non-Judeo-Christian Contexts

Change Over Time , Volume 4 (2) – Oct 21, 2014

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © 2011 University of Pennsylvania Press
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Abstract

THE CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF HISTORIC HINDU TEMPLES IN INDIA An Examination of Preservation Policies Influenced by the Venice Char ter in Non-Judeo-Christian Contexts ASHIMA KRISHNA University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Figure 1. Krishna's butterball is part of the larger complex of stone temples in the southern Indian town of Mahabalipuram (also known as Mamallapuram) in Tamil Nadu. While it is not a temple structure, the large, monolithic granite stone has defied laws of physics for centuries to balance as it does. As a result, it has been imbued with mythological significance from Hindu folklore as being the butterball that Lord Krishna played with as a child. (Ashima Krishna) Hindu temples constitute a complex architectural typology that has even more complicated cognitive associations in the form of traditional beliefs, rituals, and practices. This building typology is most abundantly found in India, but it is also growing outside the subcontinent, spurred by an increasing Hindu diaspora, making this discussion relevant in contexts far beyond India. This paper, however, examines how preservation policies in India, as well as provisions of the Venice Charter, often create conflict when applied to religious historic structures such as Hindu Temples

Journal

Change Over TimeUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 21, 2014

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