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The British Gentry, the Southern Planter, and the Northern Family Farmer: Agriculture and Sectional Antagonism in North America by James L. Huston (review)

The British Gentry, the Southern Planter, and the Northern Family Farmer: Agriculture and... "returned to Sierra Leone uninitiated and thus lacked much of the requisite ethnic, religious, and cultural mores, values, and knowledge" (226). Lawrance therefore cautions that "the mythology of family reunification [in Sierra Leone] obfuscates the experience of the child slave" (264). Not all of Lawrance's claims are as convincing. For instance, he maintains that "the transformations wrought by the proliferation of abolitionist ideologies, including mission settlements, colonization, and the mischievously named `legitimate commerce,' ushered in the single greatest expansion in the enslavement of Africans in human history" (33). That could very well be true. But Lawrance does not provide nearly enough evidence to support such a bold claim. Nevertheless, this book is still a must-read for all those interested in learning about the youngest victims of the African slave trade. Scholars of antislavery will find it stimulating, too. I was especially intrigued that abolitionists tried to win support for the Africans from La Amistad by portraying them as noble yeomen farmers and vessels for spreading Christianity. In that regard, the Africans kept being marketed, even by those who were trying to help them. In sum, Lawrance has made a critical contribution to the burgeoning historiography about the African http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The British Gentry, the Southern Planter, and the Northern Family Farmer: Agriculture and Sectional Antagonism in North America by James L. Huston (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (4) – Dec 21, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

"returned to Sierra Leone uninitiated and thus lacked much of the requisite ethnic, religious, and cultural mores, values, and knowledge" (226). Lawrance therefore cautions that "the mythology of family reunification [in Sierra Leone] obfuscates the experience of the child slave" (264). Not all of Lawrance's claims are as convincing. For instance, he maintains that "the transformations wrought by the proliferation of abolitionist ideologies, including mission settlements, colonization, and the mischievously named `legitimate commerce,' ushered in the single greatest expansion in the enslavement of Africans in human history" (33). That could very well be true. But Lawrance does not provide nearly enough evidence to support such a bold claim. Nevertheless, this book is still a must-read for all those interested in learning about the youngest victims of the African slave trade. Scholars of antislavery will find it stimulating, too. I was especially intrigued that abolitionists tried to win support for the Africans from La Amistad by portraying them as noble yeomen farmers and vessels for spreading Christianity. In that regard, the Africans kept being marketed, even by those who were trying to help them. In sum, Lawrance has made a critical contribution to the burgeoning historiography about the African

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Dec 21, 2016

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