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The Black Hawk War of 1832 (review)

The Black Hawk War of 1832 (review) REVIEWS space. Similarly, the title is a little misleading: The lower Great Lakes are Ontario and Erie, far to the east, and much of the book concerns the Wabash valley--not part of the Great Lakes waterway at all. Those caveats notwithstanding, Buss's fresh approach and deft use of rhetorical and postcolonial theory--as well as his useful and focused forays into the archive--make this an essential part of our continuing effort to reconsider midwestern, western, and ``frontier'' experiences in American history. Ed ward Wat ts is a professor of English at Michigan State University. His most recent book is In This Remote Country: Colonial French Culture in the Anglo­American Imagination, 1780­1860 (Chapel Hill, NC, 2006). The Black Hawk War of 1832. By Patrick J. Jung. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007. Pp. 275. Cloth $29.95.) Reviewed by Andrew K. Frank In 1832, nearly 1,100 Indians in the trans-Appalachian West followed the elder Sauk warrior Black Hawk and defied a federal order to remain to the west of the Mississippi River and away from their recently vacated lands in Illinois. Black Hawk and the others did not necessarily intend a violent protest of this manifestation of the American policy of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Black Hawk War of 1832 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (3) – Aug 13, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS space. Similarly, the title is a little misleading: The lower Great Lakes are Ontario and Erie, far to the east, and much of the book concerns the Wabash valley--not part of the Great Lakes waterway at all. Those caveats notwithstanding, Buss's fresh approach and deft use of rhetorical and postcolonial theory--as well as his useful and focused forays into the archive--make this an essential part of our continuing effort to reconsider midwestern, western, and ``frontier'' experiences in American history. Ed ward Wat ts is a professor of English at Michigan State University. His most recent book is In This Remote Country: Colonial French Culture in the Anglo­American Imagination, 1780­1860 (Chapel Hill, NC, 2006). The Black Hawk War of 1832. By Patrick J. Jung. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007. Pp. 275. Cloth $29.95.) Reviewed by Andrew K. Frank In 1832, nearly 1,100 Indians in the trans-Appalachian West followed the elder Sauk warrior Black Hawk and defied a federal order to remain to the west of the Mississippi River and away from their recently vacated lands in Illinois. Black Hawk and the others did not necessarily intend a violent protest of this manifestation of the American policy of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 13, 2012

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