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The Birth of Modern Politics: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828 , and: Vindicating Andrew Jackson: The 1828 Election and the Rise of the Two Party System (review)

The Birth of Modern Politics: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828 , and:... tively shows the ways in which Morgan's ethnographical vision developed out of this intellectual constellation. Yet ultimately Moses's biography is marked by a number of problems. The most glaring is that it shows little development between its origins as a dissertation and its publication as a book. Moses makes no attempt to engage with scholarship published in the last decade, and this often provides for rather thin interpretations. One would expect to see engagement with works like Steven Conn's recent study of the place of the Indian in nineteenthcentury Euro-American thought, yet it is surprisingly absent.1 Sometimes Moses simply summarizes the work of others, offering little in the way of his own interpretation.2 Moreover, perhaps as a result of the thin secondary literature, efforts at contextualizing Morgan often come off as textbook reductions of major nineteenth-century phenomena, most commonly in this case, the market revolution. Finally, while all authors pick and choose their focus, Moses sometimes focuses on Morgan's social evolution to the detriment of other important facets of his oeuvre, most glaringly Morgan's work on kinship and natural history, which are summarized but never dealt with adequately. Br ian C onn oll y is an assistant professor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Birth of Modern Politics: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828 , and: Vindicating Andrew Jackson: The 1828 Election and the Rise of the Two Party System (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

tively shows the ways in which Morgan's ethnographical vision developed out of this intellectual constellation. Yet ultimately Moses's biography is marked by a number of problems. The most glaring is that it shows little development between its origins as a dissertation and its publication as a book. Moses makes no attempt to engage with scholarship published in the last decade, and this often provides for rather thin interpretations. One would expect to see engagement with works like Steven Conn's recent study of the place of the Indian in nineteenthcentury Euro-American thought, yet it is surprisingly absent.1 Sometimes Moses simply summarizes the work of others, offering little in the way of his own interpretation.2 Moreover, perhaps as a result of the thin secondary literature, efforts at contextualizing Morgan often come off as textbook reductions of major nineteenth-century phenomena, most commonly in this case, the market revolution. Finally, while all authors pick and choose their focus, Moses sometimes focuses on Morgan's social evolution to the detriment of other important facets of his oeuvre, most glaringly Morgan's work on kinship and natural history, which are summarized but never dealt with adequately. Br ian C onn oll y is an assistant professor

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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