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The Arts of War and Peace: Theatricality and Sexuality in the Early Republic

The Arts of War and Peace: Theatricality and Sexuality in the Early Republic The Arts of War and Peace Theatricality and Sexuality in the Early Republic JASON SHAFFER If David Shields and Fredrika Teute have illuminated the theatrical quality of elite social interaction during the Revolutionary and Federalist eras, they have also offered a more than credible job analyzing an actual theatrical performance: the Meschianza, a mixed-media extravanganza performed by British troops and colonial ladies at Philadelphia in 1779. By now, the importance of the theatre and theatricality for the study of early America must be clear to anyone following the field for the last several decades.1 From Kenneth Silverman's attention to theatrical events in his encyclopedic Cultural History of the American Revolution to recent work by Heather Nathans, Odai Johnson, and myself, the history of the early American theatre has become a subject meriting serious Jason Shaffer is associate professor of English at the United States Naval Academy. He is the author of Performing Patriotism: National Identity in the Colonial and Revolutionary American Theater (Philadelphia, 2007). His essays have appeared in, among other places, Theatre Survey, Early American Literature, and Comparative Drama. 1. See Jean-Christophe Agnew, Worlds Apart: The Market and the Theater in Anglo-American Thought, 1550­1750 (Cambridge, UK, 1986); http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Arts of War and Peace: Theatricality and Sexuality in the Early Republic

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (2) – Apr 29, 2015

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Arts of War and Peace Theatricality and Sexuality in the Early Republic JASON SHAFFER If David Shields and Fredrika Teute have illuminated the theatrical quality of elite social interaction during the Revolutionary and Federalist eras, they have also offered a more than credible job analyzing an actual theatrical performance: the Meschianza, a mixed-media extravanganza performed by British troops and colonial ladies at Philadelphia in 1779. By now, the importance of the theatre and theatricality for the study of early America must be clear to anyone following the field for the last several decades.1 From Kenneth Silverman's attention to theatrical events in his encyclopedic Cultural History of the American Revolution to recent work by Heather Nathans, Odai Johnson, and myself, the history of the early American theatre has become a subject meriting serious Jason Shaffer is associate professor of English at the United States Naval Academy. He is the author of Performing Patriotism: National Identity in the Colonial and Revolutionary American Theater (Philadelphia, 2007). His essays have appeared in, among other places, Theatre Survey, Early American Literature, and Comparative Drama. 1. See Jean-Christophe Agnew, Worlds Apart: The Market and the Theater in Anglo-American Thought, 1550­1750 (Cambridge, UK, 1986);

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 29, 2015

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