Taming Passion for the Public Good: Policing Sex in the Early Republic by Mark E. Kann (review)

Taming Passion for the Public Good: Policing Sex in the Early Republic by Mark E. Kann (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2014) Copperheads were a formidable force; consequently he endorsed Lincoln's re-election bid and Gen. Nathaniel Banks's tentative approach to African American voting in wartime Louisiana. Wendell Phillips, conversely, sensed that northerners were open to more radical measures, including a John C. Fremont presidency and suffrage for black men in Louisiana. When the war concluded, the two men's disparate takes on northern sentiment once again led to disputes, this time over abolitionists' postwar agenda. Garrison and Phillips disagreed on important issues partly because they had no accurate way of gauging public opinion. Garrisonians naturally interpreted the Civil War's outcome in a transnational perspective. It was not just a victory for millions of emancipated black Americans. Nor was it merely a triumph for democracy in America. Rather, it was a signal event in the global fight for freedom. After three decades of tireless toil, Garrison craved public vindication-- understandably, given how what had once been abolitionist heresies were now the law of the land. But the unfinished work of Reconstruction, along with his belief that outside activists must stir democracies, compelled Garrison to agitate to the end. In doing so, notes McDaniel, he and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Taming Passion for the Public Good: Policing Sex in the Early Republic by Mark E. Kann (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 34 (1) – Jan 28, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2014) Copperheads were a formidable force; consequently he endorsed Lincoln's re-election bid and Gen. Nathaniel Banks's tentative approach to African American voting in wartime Louisiana. Wendell Phillips, conversely, sensed that northerners were open to more radical measures, including a John C. Fremont presidency and suffrage for black men in Louisiana. When the war concluded, the two men's disparate takes on northern sentiment once again led to disputes, this time over abolitionists' postwar agenda. Garrison and Phillips disagreed on important issues partly because they had no accurate way of gauging public opinion. Garrisonians naturally interpreted the Civil War's outcome in a transnational perspective. It was not just a victory for millions of emancipated black Americans. Nor was it merely a triumph for democracy in America. Rather, it was a signal event in the global fight for freedom. After three decades of tireless toil, Garrison craved public vindication-- understandably, given how what had once been abolitionist heresies were now the law of the land. But the unfinished work of Reconstruction, along with his belief that outside activists must stir democracies, compelled Garrison to agitate to the end. In doing so, notes McDaniel, he and

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 28, 2014

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