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Strategies for Survival: Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia (review)

Strategies for Survival: Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia (review) REVIEWS point where he argued in the 1854 ``Political Destiny of the Colored Race on the American Continent'' (a text Hall doesn't discuss) that God clearly wanted blacks to emigrate to the southern Americas. Hall argues that all black historians of the period were interested in integrating ``themselves more fully into the language of nationhood'' (89), but that may not be true of Delany during the 1850s and Brown in the late 1850s and early 1860s. My point is that the short chapters do not leave much room for articulating differences among black historians. The relatively short chapters on relatively brief periods also don't allow much room for actual readings of the histories under consideration. Hall refers to John Ernest's complementary Liberation Historiography: African American Writers and the Challenge of History, 1794­1861 (Chapel Hill, NC, 2004) as taking a ``postmodernist approach'' that emphasizes the ``metahistorical'' (9­10). Ernest offers extensive readings of some of the antebellum texts Hall discusses, with the aim of showing how black writers self-consciously rejected traditional historical narrative and to some extent embraced a poetics of ``chaos'' (see also Ernest's recent Chaotic Justice: Rethinking African American Literary History [Chapel Hill, NC, 2009]). At times I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Strategies for Survival: Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (3) – Aug 11, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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Abstract

REVIEWS point where he argued in the 1854 ``Political Destiny of the Colored Race on the American Continent'' (a text Hall doesn't discuss) that God clearly wanted blacks to emigrate to the southern Americas. Hall argues that all black historians of the period were interested in integrating ``themselves more fully into the language of nationhood'' (89), but that may not be true of Delany during the 1850s and Brown in the late 1850s and early 1860s. My point is that the short chapters do not leave much room for articulating differences among black historians. The relatively short chapters on relatively brief periods also don't allow much room for actual readings of the histories under consideration. Hall refers to John Ernest's complementary Liberation Historiography: African American Writers and the Challenge of History, 1794­1861 (Chapel Hill, NC, 2004) as taking a ``postmodernist approach'' that emphasizes the ``metahistorical'' (9­10). Ernest offers extensive readings of some of the antebellum texts Hall discusses, with the aim of showing how black writers self-consciously rejected traditional historical narrative and to some extent embraced a poetics of ``chaos'' (see also Ernest's recent Chaotic Justice: Rethinking African American Literary History [Chapel Hill, NC, 2009]). At times I

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 11, 2011

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