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Steamboats and the Rise of the Cotton Kingdom by Robert Gudemstad (review)

Steamboats and the Rise of the Cotton Kingdom by Robert Gudemstad (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2013) unlikely that they would recognize the current state of affairs in academic publishing as progress. Wa llac e He ttl e is professor of history at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author of Inventing Stonewall Jackson (Baton Rouge, LA, 2011) and The Peculiar Democracy: Southern Democrats in Peace and Civil War (Athens, GA, 2001). Steamboats and the Rise of the Cotton Kingdom. By Robert Gudemstad. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2011. Pp. xii, 280. Cloth, $42.50.) Reviewed by Calvin Schermerhorn This concise and engaging book tells the story of technological and market development, social transformation, and ecological change through the history of steamboats in the interior South. It synthesizes previous scholarship and also adds much that is new. The book begins with the hopeful and pioneering passage of the New Orleans from Pittsburgh to New Orleans in 1811 and ends with Mark Twain's embroidering steamers into a tapestry of memory, one that helped to obscure the history Robert Gudmestad invigorates with incisive analysis and often harrowing detail. ``By the 1830s,'' he contends, ``steamboats had become the workhorses of the economy in the southern interior, as they enhanced http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Steamboats and the Rise of the Cotton Kingdom by Robert Gudemstad (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (2) – Apr 17, 2013

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2013) unlikely that they would recognize the current state of affairs in academic publishing as progress. Wa llac e He ttl e is professor of history at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author of Inventing Stonewall Jackson (Baton Rouge, LA, 2011) and The Peculiar Democracy: Southern Democrats in Peace and Civil War (Athens, GA, 2001). Steamboats and the Rise of the Cotton Kingdom. By Robert Gudemstad. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2011. Pp. xii, 280. Cloth, $42.50.) Reviewed by Calvin Schermerhorn This concise and engaging book tells the story of technological and market development, social transformation, and ecological change through the history of steamboats in the interior South. It synthesizes previous scholarship and also adds much that is new. The book begins with the hopeful and pioneering passage of the New Orleans from Pittsburgh to New Orleans in 1811 and ends with Mark Twain's embroidering steamers into a tapestry of memory, one that helped to obscure the history Robert Gudmestad invigorates with incisive analysis and often harrowing detail. ``By the 1830s,'' he contends, ``steamboats had become the workhorses of the economy in the southern interior, as they enhanced

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 17, 2013

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