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State and Citizen: British America and the Early United States ed. by Peter Thompson and Peter S. Onuf (review)

State and Citizen: British America and the Early United States ed. by Peter Thompson and Peter S.... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) State and Citizen: British America and the Early United States. Edited by Peter Thompson and Peter S. Onuf. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013. Pp. 311. Cloth, $49.50.) Reviewed by Andrew J. B. Fagal Over the course of the past decade scholars have increasingly challenged the ``myth of the weak state'' in early U.S. history. In turn, historians have attempted to create an appropriate interpretative framework to replace it. The essays in State and Citizen transform the existing narrative of how British subjects became American citizens, offering new interpretations and explaining the implications of such change on political power in the modern world. The essays are grouped into three rough chronological and thematic fields that explore the status of persons, state formation, and war. Holly Brewer's and Eliga Gould's contributions investigate the development of the institution of slavery during the colonial and Revolutionary periods. For Brewer, religious debates surrounding the Anglican Church's place in English society ``circumscribed the legal relations between sovereign and subject and master and slave'' (26). If only Christians could be subjects of the king, then the conversion and baptism of African slaves presented a very real problem http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

State and Citizen: British America and the Early United States ed. by Peter Thompson and Peter S. Onuf (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) State and Citizen: British America and the Early United States. Edited by Peter Thompson and Peter S. Onuf. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013. Pp. 311. Cloth, $49.50.) Reviewed by Andrew J. B. Fagal Over the course of the past decade scholars have increasingly challenged the ``myth of the weak state'' in early U.S. history. In turn, historians have attempted to create an appropriate interpretative framework to replace it. The essays in State and Citizen transform the existing narrative of how British subjects became American citizens, offering new interpretations and explaining the implications of such change on political power in the modern world. The essays are grouped into three rough chronological and thematic fields that explore the status of persons, state formation, and war. Holly Brewer's and Eliga Gould's contributions investigate the development of the institution of slavery during the colonial and Revolutionary periods. For Brewer, religious debates surrounding the Anglican Church's place in English society ``circumscribed the legal relations between sovereign and subject and master and slave'' (26). If only Christians could be subjects of the king, then the conversion and baptism of African slaves presented a very real problem

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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