Southern Society and Its Transformations, 1790–1860 (review)

Southern Society and Its Transformations, 1790–1860 (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2012) making, and territoriality to both the Creek Nation and the settlers from the southern United States. Her book blends a chronological structure with the ingenious use of new sources, including passports, oral legends, manuscript materials, and digitized letters and reports. In linking her specific findings to the social and political history of the southeastern United States, though, she sometimes makes questionable assertions about important issues. For example, she mentions that the Florida invasion of 1818 was ``centered less on access and acquisition of Seminole lands and more on the recovery of slaves stolen or escaped from plantations in Georgia'' (117). Maybe, but then what to do with the prevailing explanation of the attack offered at the time--namely, that undistinguished ``savages'' had murdered white settlers on the north side of the Georgia­Florida line, requiring ``just vengeance,'' a kind of national lynching of dark-skinned villains who recognized no law? She also notes that the white migrants of the 1820s were taking part in ``the great western dream . . . the Jeffersonian promise of vacant fertile lands and economic opportunity for all.'' This dream, she writes, was ``of course'' little more than fantasy, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Southern Society and Its Transformations, 1790–1860 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 32 (3) – Aug 13, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2012) making, and territoriality to both the Creek Nation and the settlers from the southern United States. Her book blends a chronological structure with the ingenious use of new sources, including passports, oral legends, manuscript materials, and digitized letters and reports. In linking her specific findings to the social and political history of the southeastern United States, though, she sometimes makes questionable assertions about important issues. For example, she mentions that the Florida invasion of 1818 was ``centered less on access and acquisition of Seminole lands and more on the recovery of slaves stolen or escaped from plantations in Georgia'' (117). Maybe, but then what to do with the prevailing explanation of the attack offered at the time--namely, that undistinguished ``savages'' had murdered white settlers on the north side of the Georgia­Florida line, requiring ``just vengeance,'' a kind of national lynching of dark-skinned villains who recognized no law? She also notes that the white migrants of the 1820s were taking part in ``the great western dream . . . the Jeffersonian promise of vacant fertile lands and economic opportunity for all.'' This dream, she writes, was ``of course'' little more than fantasy,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 13, 2012

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