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Sounds American: National Identity and the Music Cultures of the Lower Mississippi River Valley, 1800–1860 by Ann Ostendorf (review)

Sounds American: National Identity and the Music Cultures of the Lower Mississippi River Valley,... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2015) possible to practice the historian's craft of understanding people on their own terms, of asking the key historian's question of ``What did it mean to them?'' (In this case, it meant ``Union,'' not just capitulation to the South, which is a vital distinction consistently elided by Landis's hatchet-job.) Northern Democrats were indeed ``doughfaces,'' and this monograph outlines the logistics of their cooperation with southerners-- on behalf of the Union, let us not forget--more fully than any work in print. Yet when Landis insists that this is the only tale to be told about these politicians, that studying their views is an exercise that must always be reduced to questions of race and slavery, he distorts the nature of this political party and makes it seem less complex than it actually was. Yo nata n Ey al is the author of The Young America Movement and the Transformation of the Democratic Party, 1828­1861 (New York, 2007). More recently, he wrote an essay on ``Franklin Pierce, Democratic Partisan'' in A Companion to the Antebellum Presidents (West Sussex, UK, 2014). Sounds American: National Identity and the Music Cultures of the Lower Mississippi River Valley, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Sounds American: National Identity and the Music Cultures of the Lower Mississippi River Valley, 1800–1860 by Ann Ostendorf (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (3) – Aug 18, 2015

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2015) possible to practice the historian's craft of understanding people on their own terms, of asking the key historian's question of ``What did it mean to them?'' (In this case, it meant ``Union,'' not just capitulation to the South, which is a vital distinction consistently elided by Landis's hatchet-job.) Northern Democrats were indeed ``doughfaces,'' and this monograph outlines the logistics of their cooperation with southerners-- on behalf of the Union, let us not forget--more fully than any work in print. Yet when Landis insists that this is the only tale to be told about these politicians, that studying their views is an exercise that must always be reduced to questions of race and slavery, he distorts the nature of this political party and makes it seem less complex than it actually was. Yo nata n Ey al is the author of The Young America Movement and the Transformation of the Democratic Party, 1828­1861 (New York, 2007). More recently, he wrote an essay on ``Franklin Pierce, Democratic Partisan'' in A Companion to the Antebellum Presidents (West Sussex, UK, 2014). Sounds American: National Identity and the Music Cultures of the Lower Mississippi River Valley,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 18, 2015

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