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Slavery in the American Republic: Developing the Federal Government, 1791-1861 by David F. Ericson (review)

Slavery in the American Republic: Developing the Federal Government, 1791-1861 by David F.... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2013) continuity rather than simply recycling American religious identity out of old European prejudices. In that respect, The First Prejudice is a compelling showcase of what talented historians with fresh approaches can accomplish in the study of religious history. J. Kime Law son is a PhD candidate at Temple University. His current research interests are in American religious history, American Jewish history, and the history of Zionism in the American South. Slavery in the American Republic: Developing the Federal Government, 1791­1861. By David F. Ericson. (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2011. Pp. ix, 298. Cloth, $37.50.) Reviewed by Richard R. John The relationship of slavery and American politics is a historical perennial. In Slavery in the American Republic, political scientist David F. Ericson joins the discussion by emphasizing the positive role that the presence of slavery in the American republic played the development of the federal government. In the ``traditional narrative,'' Ericson contends, slavery had little to do with the development of the American state, or, at most, slowed its rise (17). Ericson finds this narrative mistaken. The mordant warnings of slaveholders John Randolph and Nathanial Macon that federal public-works spending http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Slavery in the American Republic: Developing the Federal Government, 1791-1861 by David F. Ericson (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (2) – Apr 17, 2013

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2013) continuity rather than simply recycling American religious identity out of old European prejudices. In that respect, The First Prejudice is a compelling showcase of what talented historians with fresh approaches can accomplish in the study of religious history. J. Kime Law son is a PhD candidate at Temple University. His current research interests are in American religious history, American Jewish history, and the history of Zionism in the American South. Slavery in the American Republic: Developing the Federal Government, 1791­1861. By David F. Ericson. (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2011. Pp. ix, 298. Cloth, $37.50.) Reviewed by Richard R. John The relationship of slavery and American politics is a historical perennial. In Slavery in the American Republic, political scientist David F. Ericson joins the discussion by emphasizing the positive role that the presence of slavery in the American republic played the development of the federal government. In the ``traditional narrative,'' Ericson contends, slavery had little to do with the development of the American state, or, at most, slowed its rise (17). Ericson finds this narrative mistaken. The mordant warnings of slaveholders John Randolph and Nathanial Macon that federal public-works spending

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 17, 2013

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