Slavery, Disease and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry (review)

Slavery, Disease and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2012) lines.1 The blurred ownership may explain Marrs's preference for ``modernity'' over ``capitalism.'' Marrs rues the persistence of slavery in the face of modernity but traces how profit-seeking southerners restructured the institution to pursue the progress the railroad represented. They succeeded, he concludes, without concessions. An gela Lakwet e, associate professor of history at Auburn University, is the author of Inventing the Cotton Gin: Machine and Myth in Antebellum America (Baltimore, 2003). Slavery, Disease and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry. By Peter McCandless. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. 297. Cloth, $90.) Reviewed by Tim Lockley Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries South Carolina was known to be particularly unhealthy, certainly the least healthful area on the Atlantic coast and surpassed only by New Orleans on the Gulf coast. Peter McCandless's book is a thorough and detailed study of how South Carolina came to be so unhealthy and how contemporaries reacted to the disease environment. Previous scholarship on southern medical history has tended to focus either on the health of slaves on plantations, or on the impact of specific diseases such as yellow fever. This very timely volume is the first http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Slavery, Disease and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 32 (1) – Feb 8, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2012) lines.1 The blurred ownership may explain Marrs's preference for ``modernity'' over ``capitalism.'' Marrs rues the persistence of slavery in the face of modernity but traces how profit-seeking southerners restructured the institution to pursue the progress the railroad represented. They succeeded, he concludes, without concessions. An gela Lakwet e, associate professor of history at Auburn University, is the author of Inventing the Cotton Gin: Machine and Myth in Antebellum America (Baltimore, 2003). Slavery, Disease and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry. By Peter McCandless. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. 297. Cloth, $90.) Reviewed by Tim Lockley Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries South Carolina was known to be particularly unhealthy, certainly the least healthful area on the Atlantic coast and surpassed only by New Orleans on the Gulf coast. Peter McCandless's book is a thorough and detailed study of how South Carolina came to be so unhealthy and how contemporaries reacted to the disease environment. Previous scholarship on southern medical history has tended to focus either on the health of slaves on plantations, or on the impact of specific diseases such as yellow fever. This very timely volume is the first

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 8, 2012

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