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Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island’s Sylvester Manor Plantation, 1651–1884 by Katherine Howlett Hayes (review)

Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island’s Sylvester Manor... REVIEWS Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island's Sylvester Manor Plantation, 1651­1884. By Katherine Howlett Hayes. (New York: New York University Press, 2013. Pp. 240. Cloth, $30.00.) Reviewed by Gloria McCahon Whiting In 1652, Nathaniel Sylvester left England for Shelter Island, an 8,000acre land mass on the eastern end of Long Island. The merchant soon presided over a bustling plantation. Built to provision sugar plantations in Barbados, Sylvester Manor became New York's largest slaveholding and perhaps its most diverse: Nearly two dozen bound Africans labored alongside local Algonquians and indentured Europeans on the property. Together they tended crops, pressed apples into cider, and slaughtered livestock to ship into the Atlantic. The heterogeneity of the manor's early labor force would have been unmistakable to seventeenth-century observers, but Sylvester's descendants would later misremember the plantation's past, flattening the island's complex history of slavery and race into a story of liberty that separated the Manor's Africans, Native Americans, and Europeans both temporally and spatially. In this compelling work of historical archaeology, Katherine Howlett Hayes takes a twofold approach to understanding the Manor's past: First she reconstructs the early plantation community through extensive use of archaeological evidence, and then http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island’s Sylvester Manor Plantation, 1651–1884 by Katherine Howlett Hayes (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (2)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island's Sylvester Manor Plantation, 1651­1884. By Katherine Howlett Hayes. (New York: New York University Press, 2013. Pp. 240. Cloth, $30.00.) Reviewed by Gloria McCahon Whiting In 1652, Nathaniel Sylvester left England for Shelter Island, an 8,000acre land mass on the eastern end of Long Island. The merchant soon presided over a bustling plantation. Built to provision sugar plantations in Barbados, Sylvester Manor became New York's largest slaveholding and perhaps its most diverse: Nearly two dozen bound Africans labored alongside local Algonquians and indentured Europeans on the property. Together they tended crops, pressed apples into cider, and slaughtered livestock to ship into the Atlantic. The heterogeneity of the manor's early labor force would have been unmistakable to seventeenth-century observers, but Sylvester's descendants would later misremember the plantation's past, flattening the island's complex history of slavery and race into a story of liberty that separated the Manor's Africans, Native Americans, and Europeans both temporally and spatially. In this compelling work of historical archaeology, Katherine Howlett Hayes takes a twofold approach to understanding the Manor's past: First she reconstructs the early plantation community through extensive use of archaeological evidence, and then

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

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